climate change – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 22:40:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png climate change – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 Octopuses use human waste for shelter, camouflage and more, study finds https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/octopuses-use-human-waste-for-shelter-camouflage-and-more-study-finds/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 22:40:55 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/octopuses-use-human-waste-for-shelter-camouflage-and-more-study-finds/ A new study suggests it’s increasingly common for octopuses to use bottles, cans and other human waste for shelter, camouflage their dens and even house their young. “We think it’s because of the great abundance of these man-made objects – you know, garbage – in the ocean,” said lead author Maira Proietti, an oceanographer at […]]]>

A new study suggests it’s increasingly common for octopuses to use bottles, cans and other human waste for shelter, camouflage their dens and even house their young.

“We think it’s because of the great abundance of these man-made objects – you know, garbage – in the ocean,” said lead author Maira Proietti, an oceanographer at the Federal University of Rio Grande in Brazil. . As it happens guest host Gillian Findlay.

“It’s becoming so common that they use these items for protection instead of their natural shelters, like seashells, which are becoming scarce in the ocean.”

The results are not surprising. Marine scientists and others who work on the ocean have long observed octopuses taking up residence in sunken bottles and containers. In fact, those who study creatures often use such objects to attract and capture them.

But the new study, published in last month’s Marine Pollution Bulletinis the first to use participatory photography to examine how widespread the behavior is.

Hundreds of crowdsourced photographs

The researchers examined 261 photographs of 24 different species of octopus interacting with ocean litter from around the world.

“Through these images, we have observed that it is very common for these benthic species [deep-sea] octopuses to use artificial shelters instead of natural ones,” Proietti said.

Glass objects were present in 41.6% of the photos, while plastic was observed in 24.7%.

Earlier this month, the UN approved a historic agreement to create the first-ever global treaty on plastic pollution calling plastic in the world’s oceans an “epidemic”.

Some photos showed octopuses using the trash as makeshift shelters, or even using pieces of trash to camouflage their natural dens. Others showed females using litter to house their eggs.

Still others showed the creatures “walking on stilts” – using their tentacles to walk along the seabed – while clinging to various objects they had collected.

An octopus takes refuge in a broken glass bottle. (Jean-Paul Meillon)

“At first glance, this would seem like a positive thing because since they don’t have natural shelters, they at least have artificial ones to avoid predation and protect themselves,” Proietti said. “But it could also be concerning.”

At least one octopus has been pictured sheltering in a broken glass bottle, she said, which could lead to injury. In another case, an octopus was sheltering in an old car battery, which it says could emit chemicals dangerous to marine life.

Methodological concerns

Stefan Linquist, philosopher and naturalist from the University of Guelph who studied the social behavior of octopusessays the results are not surprising and present an interesting case study for the use of participatory photography in marine studies.

While studying octopuses in New South Wales, he says he observed octopuses using discarded scallops to build shelters. These creatures also appeared to have gathered around a large concrete block on the ocean floor to provide additional shelter.

An octopus finds refuge in a plastic bottle. (Claudio Sampeio)

That said, Linquist says he has concerns about the study’s methodology. On the one hand, he says he’s missing a control subject — another animal to compare octopuses to.

“Ideally, you’d want a comparable species that also digs burrows for shelter. Then we could at least ask the question of whether octopuses are more or less dependent on litter, based on the images. In the state current affairs, we have no comparative information,” he said in an email.

Proietti says they weren’t able to study a second species because crowdsourcing the octopus photos alone was already an “extremely laborious” process, but that it would be a good idea for follow-up research.

Additionally, Linquist says what appears to be an increase in the number of junk-using creatures may actually just be increasing the availability of photographic evidence. Underwater photography has become more popular and accessible in recent years, he said.

Proietti admits that’s a possibility, and the study includes that caveat as well.

Despite these limitations, Proietti says what they observed was disturbing.

“Unfortunately, we are living in a huge environmental crisis…not only climate change, but also this litter pollution in the ocean is extremely worrying,” Proietti said.

“We need to stop the sources and collect what’s in the ocean ASAP because the impacts will only increase as well.”


Written by Sheena Goodyear. Interview with Maira Proietti directed by Katie Geleff.

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Mosaic Launches Lowest Solar Loan Price Yet to Accelerate Clean Energy Accessibility | News https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/mosaic-launches-lowest-solar-loan-price-yet-to-accelerate-clean-energy-accessibility-news/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 14:25:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/mosaic-launches-lowest-solar-loan-price-yet-to-accelerate-clean-energy-accessibility-news/ OAKLAND, CA., February 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Mosaic, a leading financing platform for solar and energy-efficient home renovations in the United States, today announced that it has reduced prices on its entire line of solar loan products. This benefits homeowners, installers and the industry as a whole by providing immediate access to some of the […]]]>

OAKLAND, CA., February 15, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Mosaic, a leading financing platform for solar and energy-efficient home renovations in the United States, today announced that it has reduced prices on its entire line of solar loan products. This benefits homeowners, installers and the industry as a whole by providing immediate access to some of the most attractive solar financing options on the market.

“The urgency around climate change and its impact on our communities continues to escalate, and we need to make it as easy and affordable as possible for even more families to switch to solar power this year,” said Billy Parish, founder and CEO of Mosaic. “We’ve been providing residential solar financing options longer than anyone, giving us more data with which to underwrite and price our loans. We’ve established ourselves as a cost-of-funds leader through our disciplined approach and our consistent performance, and we pass the benefit of this advantage on to our customers.”

Mosaic has issued more solar loan securitizations than any other solar issuer in the space. Between 2017 and 2021, the company issued 11 securitization of solar creditstotaling $2.9 billion securities offered. The company also repeatedly sets records for low cost of funds on bonds.

“By combining competitive pricing with MosaicScore, our proprietary credit score for solar loans, we believe we are able to offer our partners the best combination of pricing and homeowner approval coverage available anywhere in the market. said Parish.

A pioneer in solar and clean energy, Mosaic has helped over 200,000 homeowners transition to sustainable home solutions to date.

About Mosaic

Mosaic makes financing for solar energy storage systems, solar plus, and other sustainable home improvements accessible and affordable for homeowners by providing a quick and easy way to apply for financing options. Customers learn about Mosaic through licensed solar installers and home improvement contractors, as well as other ecosystem partners, and can get a credit decision in minutes for no-downpayment loans with premium rates. fixed interest and multiple term options. Funding requested and processed through the Mosaic platform is from Solar Mosaic LLC or one of its lending/funding partners. For our network of thousands of solar installers and home improvement contractors, Mosaic provides a streamlined financing platform to drive sales growth. Since 2012, Mosaic has helped more than 200,000 households transition to sustainable home improvements through its financing products.

Show original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mosaic-launches-lowest-solar-loan-pricing-to-date-to-accelerate-accessibility-to-clean-energy-301481588.html

SOURCE Mosaic

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Impact on society | Adventist Information Network https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/impact-on-society-adventist-information-network/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 12:27:47 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/impact-on-society-adventist-information-network/ Joseph Bates and James and Ellen White, founding leaders of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, were radical proponents of societal issues that were divisive in their time; all were active in favor of the abolition of slavery (which led to the American Civil War), and Ellen White spoke to the largest crowds about the abolition of […]]]>

Joseph Bates and James and Ellen White, founding leaders of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, were radical proponents of societal issues that were divisive in their time; all were active in favor of the abolition of slavery (which led to the American Civil War), and Ellen White spoke to the largest crowds about the abolition of alcohol through the Women’s Temperance Society.

Some Adventists have found a public voice on domestic violence, climate change and religious freedom, in many Pacific countries. It is good to be concerned about what concerns others. Hopefully we can provide a credible biblical perspective on the issues, based on personal action.

Our pioneers addressed issues important to people in society. They supported current causes. Their focus was the last-day gospel message to the world, but they also knew that justice and good living were real concerns that needed to be addressed in practical ways. They brought a Jesus-centered approach based on biblical principles to the problems of slavery and alcohol. Meeting practical needs from God’s perspective is why our denomination has established schools and hospitals.

As Adventists of this generation, what societal issues concern you and your contemporaries? What issues do you donate your money to, actively support and talk about? What issues important to Jesus and the prophets of the Bible could we bring a biblical perspective to? Poverty, domestic violence, climate change, child protection, racial discrimination, justice, lifestyle diseases, prison reform…

When Jesus and the prophets spoke about the problems of their day, it was divisive. They shared their point of view to give an alternative point of view—to give God’s perspective. Could we have the courage and the wisdom to do it today?

Engagement and connection with the community is important. God is interested in things that add value or take away meaning from every life. When we proactively speak up and respond to societal issues, it shows that we reflect God’s heart and are relevant.

This article was originally published on the Adventist Record website

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Decision on Starbucks project in Bridgwater postponed https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/decision-on-starbucks-project-in-bridgwater-postponed/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/decision-on-starbucks-project-in-bridgwater-postponed/ CAFÉ lovers in Bridgwater will have to wait a little longer to see if a new drive-thru will open in their town. WM Morrisons Supermarkets plc requested the construction of a drive-thru cafe service in the northeast corner of the car park of their existing store on The Broadway. The outlet will be occupied by […]]]>

CAFÉ lovers in Bridgwater will have to wait a little longer to see if a new drive-thru will open in their town.

WM Morrisons Supermarkets plc requested the construction of a drive-thru cafe service in the northeast corner of the car park of their existing store on The Broadway.

The outlet will be occupied by Starbucks as part of a plan to “rejuvenate underused areas” of the parking lot, creating up to 15 full-time jobs.

Sedgemoor District Council’s Development Committee was due to approve the plans at its meeting in Bridgwater on Thursday morning (February 10).

However, councilors ultimately voted to postpone a decision until more information was provided on the outlet’s impact on air pollution, anti-social behavior and existing businesses in the centre- city.

If approved, the new outlet will be built in the north east corner of the car park, which faces Broadway near the junction with the A38 Taunton Road.

In addition to the drive-thru lane, customers will have the choice of outdoor seating, with the outlet open daily from 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. (including Sundays and public holidays).

Ollie Thomas, representing the applicant, told the committee: “The proposed development is located in a suitable location on a brownfield site. This will support the continued viability and vitality of downtown Bridgwater. »

Councilor Kathy Pearce – whose Bridgwater Westover ward includes the site – spoke out strongly against the plans, arguing they run counter to council’s efforts to tackle climate change.

She said: “We should plan new developments in such a way as to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We should be encouraging people to walk, cycle and use public transport rather than drive – and I don’t understand how that meets those requirements.

“This app is presented to us as a drive-thru – therefore it will increase carbon emissions. Morrisons already has a cafe so I don’t see how presenting this as a drive-thru won’t increase carbon emissions.

Councilor Bill Revans added: ‘The officer made reference to the beneficial impact on the town center – which raised my eyebrows a bit.

“In my view this will stop people walking into the town center from Morrisons and using the town center shops.

“I’m surprised Broadway isn’t an area of ​​air pollution concern, given the amount of traffic and the impact of Hinkley Point C.”

Somerset County Gazette: Proposed location of the Starbucks Drive Thru Outlet in the parking lot of the Bridgwater Morrisons store.  CREDIT: Whittam Cox Architects.  Free to use for all BBC partners.

Planning officer Dawn de Vries responded that the Broadway was “not in an air quality problem area at this time.”

She added: ‘This will be an ancillary facility for those already visiting Morrisons. If you are visiting Morrisons by car you are not going to drive into the town center but there are pedestrian links here so you can.”

Councilor Tony Heywood – who represents the nearby borough of Bridgwater Eastover – argued the new drive-thru would add to existing problems of anti-social behavior and ‘boy racers’, leading to a lower quality of life for nearby residents.

He said: “We have significant problems in city center car parks with anti-social behaviour.

“Even when the supermarket is closed, it’s a useful place for people to congregate, and when it’s open, it’s a place for people to dump their trash.”

Councilor Alistair Hendry, on the other hand, said concerns about pollution, litter and anti-social behavior were largely unfounded.

He said: “The McDonald’s drive-thru people [on The Clink] grab their coffees and leave – what they do after that is out of our control. Starbucks would be exactly the same.

“What is the difference in air pollution outside a McDonalds and a Starbucks? Male runners can’t do their thing around Morrisons so easily, as it’s a narrow entrance near the gas station.

A motion to approve the plans narrowly failed five to six, with two councilors abstaining.

The committee then decided, by a margin of eight to five, to defer its decision until more information had been provided by the claimant on how the plans would affect air quality, incivility and downtown vitality.

The board did not say how soon the plans will come back to the committee.

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Reviews | Big corporations won’t save us on their own https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/reviews-big-corporations-wont-save-us-on-their-own/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 10:00:17 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/reviews-big-corporations-wont-save-us-on-their-own/ Today, some of the wealthiest Americans may be increasingly uncomfortable with the political destabilization that can accompany extreme inequality, and some may worry about the impact of climate change on their ability to generate profit. But that doesn’t mean they’re eager to do the kinds of things that could actually tackle inequality or provide a […]]]>

Today, some of the wealthiest Americans may be increasingly uncomfortable with the political destabilization that can accompany extreme inequality, and some may worry about the impact of climate change on their ability to generate profit. But that doesn’t mean they’re eager to do the kinds of things that could actually tackle inequality or provide a meaningful pathway to a world less in danger of destroying itself. Mr. Fink’s letter may have been partly born out of good intentions, but opposition from the Business Roundtable (whose members run many of the biggest companies in the economy, including BlackRock) to potential increases in l Corporate tax in Build Back Better played a key role in its crushing – and relatively limited climate proposals.

Opinion talk
The climate and the world are changing. What challenges will the future bring and how should we respond to them?

As Andrew Perez and David Sirota reported in Jacobin, the US Chamber of Commerce has strongly opposed any filibuster reform, in part because it would make it easier to pass laws that, for example, could make it easier for workers to unionize.

An imaginary capitalism that magically balances the interests of workers, investors, communities, and shareholders has great allure, but pursuing it is a self-defeating strategy — and rooted in political desperation. Focusing political energy on securing the commitment of a group of business elites would undermine the commitment of a broad democratic base that must be the real basis for substantial reform. To solve many of our deepest problems, nothing less than a redistribution of economic and political power will be needed, and this will only happen in the face of opposition from corporations and the wealthy.

The trend towards social responsibility in general undermines the idea of ​​citizenship and of a public sphere as the place where decisions and debates on economic and social policy are played out. Corporate commitment to democratic norms is quite superficial, or at least it emphasizes a narrow understanding of what they are.

You can see this dynamic even at BlackRock. Environmental activists have been protesting BlackRock for years, calling on it to withdraw its investments in oil, gas and coal companies. But despite all of Mr Fink’s rhetoric about the long-term problem of climate change, his company has been unwilling to divest itself of these businesses, despite his company’s 2020 pledge to halt investment in companies that were pulling more than 25% of their revenues from thermal coal. . (Corporations, he wrote in defense of his approach, “cannot be climate police,” and he called on governments to do more.)

The reality is that there is no getting around the hard and controversial work of building politics that can support a more democratic culture. The only thing that has made elites support such causes in the past – timid as it is – is pressure from political and social movements.

If they were stronger today, the obstruction of Senators Manchin and Sinema would look like the actions of reactionaries with nowhere to turn rather than an insoluble stranglehold on any reform effort. And even if we hear less about stakeholder capitalism, we would have a public domain that could realize the idea of ​​the common good.

Kim Phillips-Fein, a historian at New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, is the author, most recently, of “Fear City: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics” and “Invisible Hands : The Businessmen’s Crusade Against the New Deal.

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Bucks County Audubon Society gets $154,000 for restoration project https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/bucks-county-audubon-society-gets-154000-for-restoration-project/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 18:41:26 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/bucks-county-audubon-society-gets-154000-for-restoration-project/ NEW HOPE, PA — A grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection will support the Bucks County Audubon Society’s restoration work at Honey Hollow Creek, according to a news release. This year’s Growing Greener Grants were announced Thursday, with amounts totaling more than $3.5 million distributed across southeastern Pennsylvania for watershed restoration and protection. […]]]>

NEW HOPE, PA — A grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection will support the Bucks County Audubon Society’s restoration work at Honey Hollow Creek, according to a news release.

This year’s Growing Greener Grants were announced Thursday, with amounts totaling more than $3.5 million distributed across southeastern Pennsylvania for watershed restoration and protection.

“Growing Greener is the single largest investment of public funds that goes directly to solving critical environmental issues of the 21st century,” said DEP Southeast Regional Director Pat Patterson. “As we continue to see the impacts of climate change, it is imperative that we use funds to invest in, protect and restore our watersheds.”

Growing Greener grants are awarded for projects in three categories: watershed restoration and protection; rehabilitation of abandoned mines; and abandoned oil and gas well plugging projects. Across the state, this year’s awards exceed $18 million and will fund projects focused on design, construction, education and awareness.

The Bucks County Audubon Society in Honey Hollow, which spans 110 acres with 6 miles of trails, meadows, forests, ponds, wetlands and streams, received $154,100.

The Audubon Society will use these funds to design and authorize the re-regulation of the Honey Hollow Creek Dam, stream stabilization and floodplain restoration.

Three other agencies also received funds to distribute for appropriate projects: the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture to administer farmland preservation projects, the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources for renovation and improving state parks, and the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority for upgrading water and sewer systems. .

Approved projects in southeastern Pennsylvania include:

deer

  • Borough of Langhorne Manor: Comly Avenue Water Quality Improvements, $230,000
  • Township of Northampton: Northampton Crossing Basin Renovation, $300,000

Chester

  • Stroud Water Research Center, Inc.: Best Agricultural Management Practices (BMPs) and Forestry Buffers for Red Clay Creek 2022, $495,944
  • Chester County Conservation District: Mushroom Farm Resource Conservator, $199,680
  • Township of Tredyffrin: Township of Tredyffrin Rain Garden Program, $12,740
  • Township of Tredyffrin: Bair Road/Trout Creek Infiltration, Water Quality and Flood Mitigation Project, $340,000
  • Brandywine Conservancy and Museum of Art: Assessing and Improving Water Quality in the Brandywine-Christina Watershed, $269,298

Delaware

  • Township of Radnor: West Wayne Preserve Water Quality Improvement and Flood Reduction Project, $480,000
  • Glenolden Borough: Wildlife and Aquatic Habitat Enhancement in Glenolden Community Park, $224,475
  • Township of Darby: Conway Park Shoreline Restoration Water Quality Improvement Project, $216,300

Delaware and Philadelphia

  • Pennsylvania Resources Council, Inc.: Growing Greener Communities, $244,475 Philadelphia
  • Pennsylvania Horticultural Society: TreeVitalize Watersheds 16, $250,000

Learn more about the Bucks County Audubon Society in Honey Hollow.


Be the first to know what’s happening in New Hope when you subscribe to Patch.

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Mitt Romney: A review of 2021 and a look at the sequel | Opinion https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/mitt-romney-a-review-of-2021-and-a-look-at-the-sequel-opinion/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 16:28:15 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/mitt-romney-a-review-of-2021-and-a-look-at-the-sequel-opinion/ I could never have predicted what we went through in 2021. COVID-19 came and went, and came back. Vaccines have been both praised and maligned. We left Afghanistan as if we had learned nothing from our shameful exit from Vietnam. And in Washington, the president and Democrats have embarked on gargantuan social policy and spending […]]]>


I could never have predicted what we went through in 2021. COVID-19 came and went, and came back. Vaccines have been both praised and maligned. We left Afghanistan as if we had learned nothing from our shameful exit from Vietnam. And in Washington, the president and Democrats have embarked on gargantuan social policy and spending spree. In addition, their spending has spurred inflation that is increasingly reminiscent of the Jimmy Carter years.

Despite this somewhat bleak backdrop, I have been honored to serve the people of Utah by introducing and passing several bills that will make a positive difference.

First, I worked with a small bipartisan group of five Democrats and five Republicans to do what every president since George HW Bush had hoped to do: negotiate and pass an infrastructure bill.

Our bipartisan bill makes a historic investment in roads, highways, bridges, electricity grids and broadband across the country – without raising taxes or increasing our debt. Of particular importance to Utah, it provides funds to mitigate wildfires, tackle our drought, help fund the Central Utah Water Project, and provide running water to the Navajo in Utah. Basically, it enables officials in the state of Utah to plan and execute the highways, transit, water and other infrastructure requirements for the rapid growth that we will continue to experience. over the next few decades.

One provision of our bill includes the Wildland Fire Mitigation and Management Commission Act, which I brought forward with Senator Mark Kelly, D-Arizona, and Representative John Curtis, R-Utah. This establishes a commission of federal and non-federal actors to study, recommend and fund new forest fire prevention, mitigation, management and rehabilitation policies for forests and grasslands. Drought and global warming mean that the ways we have dealt with wildfires in the past are no longer adequate.

Our bipartisan infrastructure bill stands in stark contrast to the presidential multibillion-dollar spending and tax hikes program euphemistically called “Build Back Better.” His bill grants benefits to illegal immigrants, gives tax breaks to millionaires in the Blue State, promotes the Green New Deal, and pushes the federal government toward preschool and child care. I joined with all Republicans in Congress in opposing this senseless expansion of government.

Although I strongly oppose the Green New Deal, climate change remains one of my main concerns. A bill, which I promoted and which was passed by the Senate this year, facilitates the participation of farmers, ranchers and private landowners in voluntary carbon markets and encourages the reduction of harmful emissions.

My service on the Foreign Relations Committee has also enabled me to meet the challenges we face abroad. I am particularly concerned about China’s predatory economic policies, its military aggression and horrific human rights violations and the genocide of minorities.

China follows an explicit strategy to dominate the world economically, militarily and geopolitically. For our part, we respond to China’s actions on an ad hoc and disjointed basis. The recently passed Defense Authorization Bill includes a measure I drafted that requires the administration to develop and implement a comprehensive strategy to meet China’s ambitions.

In addition, Senator Tim Kaine, D-Va., And I introduced an amendment demanding a diplomatic boycott of the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics in order to shed light on China’s abuses against the Uyghur people. The administration recently announced the diplomatic boycott as official U.S. policy, and several other free nations, including Britain, Canada, Japan and Australia, have followed suit.

As the home of our nation’s strategic ground deterrence program, Hill Air Force Base in Utah plays a critical role in sustaining and modernizing our nuclear deterrence – a critical component of our ability to deter aggression. Chinese and Russian. Hill also helps repair and maintain the U.S. F-35 fleet. This year’s defense bill, which I have enthusiastically supported, includes an authorization of $ 4.4 billion for the Air Force’s F-35A program and $ 2.6 billion for the GBSD program.

Look ahead

As I plan for the year ahead, I am increasingly concerned about our growing deficits and our national debt. My TRUST Act legislation, now sponsored by Senator Joe Manchin, D-WVa., And a bipartisan group of 10 other senators, is designed to tame federal spending and borrowing. In addition, it provides for the future solvency of social security and health insurance trust funds.

Our declining national birth rate and the resulting financial pressure from inflation make the review of my Family Security Act even more urgent. Even the New York Times editorialized that it’s better than what President Biden has proposed. It would support families with children, help financially during pregnancy, promote marriage and provide equal treatment for working and stay-at-home parents.

I will continue to fight for many of Utah’s other priorities, including securing funding for rural programs and working to restore more local control to our state’s public lands. Senator Lee and I reintroduced the Utah Rural Economy Protection Act (PURE), which would protect Utah from abuse of the Presidential Antiquities Act in the same way as Alaska and Wyoming are currently protected.

It is an honor to serve the people of our state. If you have any suggestions and advice for me, please feel free to write or email me on my website (http://romney.senate.gov).

I wish you and your family the best for a safe and healthy 2022.

Senator Mitt Romney has served as a United States Senator from Utah since 2019.


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Remembering the explorer on the loose Dr Thomas Lovejoy – National Geographic Society newsroom https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/remembering-the-explorer-on-the-loose-dr-thomas-lovejoy-national-geographic-society-newsroom/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 21:00:48 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/remembering-the-explorer-on-the-loose-dr-thomas-lovejoy-national-geographic-society-newsroom/ The National Geographic Society is deeply saddened by the passing of National Geographic Explorer at Large and renowned conservation biologist Dr Thomas Lovejoy. Our condolences go out to Tom’s family, friends and colleagues at this time. Throughout his career, Tom has made impressive contributions to the field of conservation biology and has drawn attention to […]]]>


The National Geographic Society is deeply saddened by the passing of National Geographic Explorer at Large and renowned conservation biologist Dr Thomas Lovejoy. Our condolences go out to Tom’s family, friends and colleagues at this time.

Throughout his career, Tom has made impressive contributions to the field of conservation biology and has drawn attention to the fragile state of our environment. He is well known for popularizing the term “biological diversity” and analyzing the interplay between climate change and biodiversity, including his work in the Brazilian Amazon rainforests.

Tom joined the National Geographic community in 1971 when he received his first grant to study the ecology of rainforest birds in the Amazon. He was then a member of the Company’s Research and Exploration Committee, Ocean Restoration Advisory Board; the Chairman of the Big Cats Initiatives Grants Committee and the Great Energy Challenge Advisory Committee; and as scientific advisor to the Society‘s Chief Scientist and his perpetual expeditions to the planet. In 2019 he was selected as a National Geographic Explorer at Large, a title he held until his death.

Tom leaves behind a tremendous legacy in the fields of conservation and biology, as well as in the Society. We are proud to have known and worked with Tom over the past five decades.

Given its impact on National Geographic, we asked some of our contributors to share their thoughts:

“Tom left a deep legacy in the field of biology and at the National Geographic Society, where he was a beloved member of our community for over 50 years. To know Tom was to know an extraordinary scientist, teacher, advisor and unyielding champion of our planet. It has also been a consummate connector, helping to bring people and organizations together to preserve and protect some of our most fragile ecosystems and species. Tom’s pioneering Amazon research, passionate advocacy, and many other accomplishments have helped us better understand, appreciate and care for the great diversity of life on our planet. He left an indelible mark on all of us and will be sorely missed. ” – Jill Tiefenthaler, CEO

“I am deeply saddened by the passing of my friend Tom Lovejoy. As a global champion in increasing and disseminating knowledge of environmental science, Tom exemplified what it means to be a National Geographic explorer. was eternally hopeful and always generous with his time, especially with early career scientists. Tom was a beloved member of the National Geographic community for 50 years, and I am grateful to have had the opportunity to know him both professionally and personally.

– Alex Moen, Head of Chief Explorer Engagement

Tom was a giant in the field of ecology and conservation. He showed the world how the fragmentation of tropical forests into fragments accelerates the extinction of species and the degradation of entire ecosystems, and coined the term “biological diversity”, among many other scientific achievements. He fought hard for the conservation of the Amazon rainforest. But more importantly, he was a wonderful mentor and extremely generous with his students, colleagues and friends. He was the epitome of the “gentleman and scholar”. My dear friend will miss me, but his legacy and inspiration will stay with us forever. – Enric sala, explorer in residence


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UWI Professor Michael Taylor named one of the 100 Most Influential Academics in Politics https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/uwi-professor-michael-taylor-named-one-of-the-100-most-influential-academics-in-politics/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 13:52:18 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/uwi-professor-michael-taylor-named-one-of-the-100-most-influential-academics-in-politics/ Professor Michael Taylor, University of the West Indies, (UWI) Mona Campus’ Professor of Climate Science, Dean of the Faculty of Science and Technology and a world-renowned expert in climate science has been named among the 100 most influential academics in the government of Apolitics. Professor Michael Taylor, Professor of Climate Science and Dean of the […]]]>


Professor Michael Taylor, University of the West Indies, (UWI) Mona Campus’ Professor of Climate Science, Dean of the Faculty of Science and Technology and a world-renowned expert in climate science has been named among the 100 most influential academics in the government of Apolitics.

Professor Michael Taylor, Professor of Climate Science and Dean of the Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona Campus.

This list, according to Apolitique, “highlights work that has influenced the policy-making process by providing information on policy issues, contributing innovative ideas and solutions, or adding relevant and informative data. Apolitique also noted that every candidate on this list is “committed to improving the work of government and that their research has already had an impact.”

Each year, Apolitics recognizes academics working in important policy areas that are the focus of governments around the world and which by their very nature often present and even require intergovernmental collaboration. Areas selected this year included climate and sustainability, the area for which Professor Taylor is known; Recovery from COVID-19; Jobs and skills; Social policy; and policy development processes and approaches.

Speaking on the recent announcement, Prof Taylor said: “I am grateful to have been nominated and deeply touched to have been selected for inclusion. I see it more than an individual honor but rather a shared honor, for it is an honor to which the Caribbean intellectual community and the UWI in particular have contributed. I am just the representative of the many Caribbean academics who through their hard work strive to make an impact and a difference for the better.

Professor Taylor was the lead coordinating author of the special report on 1.5 degrees produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The IPCC report followed the Caribbean’s “1.5 to Stay Alive” campaign which drew on UWI’s climate change research and modeling. The campaign is credited with mobilizing the global effort to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees above pre-industrial levels to minimize the catastrophic effects of climate change. Professor Taylor’s research has received worldwide recognition, positioning UWI to be selected by the International Association of Universities (IAU) to lead the mobilization of research and advocacy as the world moves towards a “smart world in the face of weather”. Professor Taylor’s leadership in this area has been instrumental in UWI as the head of the United Nations Global University Consortium on Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 13: Climate Action, as well as in the role of Head of file from UWI into a specialized network known as the Commonwealth Climate Resilience Network. (CCRN) – established by the Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU) and other similar associations.

Professor Taylor is also Co-Director of the Climate Studies Group, Mona (CSGM), which he has successfully positioned as a center of regional reflection and expertise in climate change science and as a primary center for coordination regional climate modeling efforts.

UWI is proud to make scientific research to fight climate change a top priority and to attract the best scientific researchers who have sounded the alarm bells on the climate crisis for more than five decades. Thirteen scientists from UWI contributed to the Sixth Assessment Round of the IPCC to produce the three-volume global assessment report, known as the “Sixth Report” and “Three Special Reports”, which were presented to the COP26, held this year in Glasgow, Scotland, United States. Kingdom. Professor Taylor described COP26 as a “politically important moment”. He underscored the importance of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report (AR6), which states that “global warming of 1.5 ° C and 2 ° C will be exceeded in the 21st century, unless significant reductions in CO2 emissions and other greenhouse gases will only occur in the decades to come. . Professor Taylor warned that heading towards 2 ° C is too much for Small Island Developing States (SIDS) like the Caribbean, noting that even at 1.5 ° C, ‘we only have half a chance a livable future.

Reacting to the announcement from Professional Vice Chancellor and UWI Campus Director Mona, Professor Dale Webber said: “As scientists, we know that research and the results that flow from it can change the world. Professor Taylor being named one of the most influential academics is not a big surprise to me as he has always been ahead of his time and very strategic in his approach to climate science. He has always focused on practical, impactful and achievable goals in our global response to climate change, which is evident from his work with the IPCC and the climate study group he leads here at Mona. It is a moment of great pride for us as a campus and as a regional university. “

About apolitics

Apolitique was founded by mission-driven entrepreneurs supported by impact investors in Europe, North America, Asia, Africa and Australasia and supported by a Horizon 2020 grant from the EU. It is a for-profit business and a B certified company. Source: https://about.aphysical.co/our-story


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Musk sells Tesla shares worth $ 528 million as he pursues sale of 10% stake https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/musk-sells-tesla-shares-worth-528-million-as-he-pursues-sale-of-10-stake/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 07:36:06 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/musk-sells-tesla-shares-worth-528-million-as-he-pursues-sale-of-10-stake/ Tesla chief executive Elon Musk unloads an additional 583,611 shares worth $ 528 million in the electric vehicle maker as he moves closer to his pledge to sell 10% of his stake in the electric vehicle pioneer amid criticism that he isn’t paying enough taxes. Mr. Musk, the richest person in the world according to […]]]>


Tesla chief executive Elon Musk unloads an additional 583,611 shares worth $ 528 million in the electric vehicle maker as he moves closer to his pledge to sell 10% of his stake in the electric vehicle pioneer amid criticism that he isn’t paying enough taxes.

Mr. Musk, the richest person in the world according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index with $ 245 billion on Wednesday, has now sold about 13.5 million shares worth about $ 14.1 billion, according to regulatory documents. He’s now three-quarters of the way to meeting his pledge and needs to sell an additional 17 million shares to fulfill it, assuming that doesn’t include exercisable options.

The latest share sale comes after Mr. Musk sold 934,091 Tesla shares worth around $ 906.5 million. The move, however, cost the automaker its $ 1,000 billion market cap status, the first time it has gone below the bar since Oct. 25.

As of Wednesday morning, the market cap of California-based Tesla was nearly $ 917 billion.

On November 24, Mr. Musk sold 934,091 shares for $ 1.05 billion, after a few days of hiatus, while also exercising 2.15 million stock options.

The billionaire got rid of his shares in Tesla after taking a Twitter poll of his more than 67.2 million followers to see if he should sell part of his stake in the automaker.

Mr Musk first revealed his intention to sell shares at the 2021 code conference in September. That same month, he established a pre-arranged trading plan to effect “an orderly sale of shares linked to the exercise of stock options,” according to documents. The Twitter poll did not reveal the existence of this plan.

His offloading of shares comes as he opposes the US Democrats’ “billionaire tax”, which solicits contributions from America’s richest by taxing their “marketable assets”. The proposed tax is expected to help fund US President Joe Biden’s ambitious social policy and climate change legislation.

Last week, Mr Musk faced the wrath of US Senator Elizabeth Warren, who tweeted that he should pay taxes instead of “offloading everyone”. Mr. Musk replied that he “will pay more taxes than any American in history this year.”

On Monday, he tweeted that he would pay $ 11 billion in taxes in 2021.

Mr. Musk, a prolific tweeter whose posts notoriously move cryptocurrency stock prices and don’t always amuse regulators, even found time to joke about “quitting my job” amid his frenzy of sale of shares.

Time The magazine named Mr. Musk Personality of the Year on December 13.

Tesla posted its largest quarterly net profit, thanks to record shipments amid a global semiconductor shortage and supply chain disruptions in its fiscal third quarter ending in September

Profits jumped about 389% to $ 1.6 billion, nearly $ 1.3 billion more than revenue earned in the same period a year ago. It was the ninth consecutive profitable quarter and the second consecutive three-month period with more than $ 1 billion in profits for the company. Revenue rose 57% to nearly $ 13.8 billion, beating analysts’ expectations, the fourth time in a row it reported $ 10 billion or more in sales.

Updated: December 22, 2021, 7:33 AM



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