health care – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 06:03:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png health care – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 Action Needed to Stop US Child Poverty Rate From Rising Again, Experts Say | American News https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/action-needed-to-stop-us-child-poverty-rate-from-rising-again-experts-say-american-news/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 06:03:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/action-needed-to-stop-us-child-poverty-rate-from-rising-again-experts-say-american-news/ The child poverty rate in the United States has improved dramatically due to the expansion of the social safety net during the Covid-19 pandemic, but experts warn that the expiry of these measures could reverse these historical gains . As the pandemic has put pressure on the well-being of millions of children, new measures have […]]]>

The child poverty rate in the United States has improved dramatically due to the expansion of the social safety net during the Covid-19 pandemic, but experts warn that the expiry of these measures could reverse these historical gains .

As the pandemic has put pressure on the well-being of millions of children, new measures have dramatically improved children’s well-being. The child poverty rate has fallen from 14.2% in 2018 to less than 5.6% in 2021, and the extreme poverty rate has been reduced by almost half, according to projections.

“Child poverty in the United States is not inevitable. It’s a choice,” said Lisa Chamberlain, professor of pediatrics at Stanford School of Medicine and co-author of a perspective published Monday in the journal Jama Pediatrics. “It’s not a question of how to do this – it’s a question of political will.”

The Child Tax Credit, the main driver of these changes, has reduced child poverty by about 40%. Starting in July, it provided monthly checks to families. The vast majority of these funds paid for basic necessities, including food, clothing, housing, utilities and education.

Other extensions of the safety net in the pandemic include three stimulus checks, a moratorium on evictions, increased unemployment benefits and more funding for food, through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (Snap ) and housing.

“The expansion of all of these has really caused a historic decline in child poverty,” Chamberlain said.

Without this support, almost a third of children would live in poverty, according to research.

The benefits “have made a huge difference – not only preventing what could have been the worst-case scenario in terms of rising poverty, but actually leading to dramatically lower poverty rates than we’ve seen for decades. decades,” said policy director Megan Curran. at Columbia University’s Center on Poverty and Social Policy.

The child poverty rate in 2020 was the lowest since the US Census Bureau began measuring in the 1960s, and 2021 may have been even lower, she said. “So that’s huge.”

But the child tax credit expired in January, pushing around 3.7 million children into poverty – a 41% increase from December, according to the centre’s analysis.

“There was basically a cliff between December 2021 and January 2022,” Curran said. “Without the payments, families have certainly suffered over the past two months.”

Families are once again struggling to buy food, pay rent and keep lights on, especially as food and energy costs have risen. “It’s a double whammy they’re taking, which is the loss of payments and the increased prices of these essential commodities as well,” Curran said.

The Build Back Better bill would have extended the credit, but it stalled in the U.S. Senate after opposition from Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin, who cited the child tax credit as one of the reasons he canceled the bill.

There is a huge economic benefit to reducing child poverty, research shows. Poverty can lead to hunger, poor health, poor education and poorer job prospects.

“Not having enough food, not having stable places to live – all of that disrupts their ability to really engage with school,” Chamberlain said. “The ability to engage in the classroom, to engage in their educational process, is what ultimately leads them to their ultimate potential of being able to have a good job and contribute.”

Child poverty costs the United States between $800 billion and $1.1 billion each year due to lost adult productivity and rising health care and criminal justice costs, according to the report. National Academy of Sciences. According to the researchers, poverty reduction programs have strong moral and economic justifications.

“Child poverty actually costs us as a country an incredible amount of money every year,” Curran said. “Dramatically reducing child poverty not only helps children on a personal and family level, it also makes sense economically.”

Some opponents argued that the credit could discourage families from working, but research shows there was no noticeable effect on employment.

In fact, according to the researchers, the money could be used for childcare, allowing parents to work more – especially during the pandemic, when many informal caregivers, such as grandparents, have been lost. due to death and disability.

“The Covid disability numbers for this have been really, really tough – and we’ve seen huge numbers of women leaving the workforce,” Chamberlain said.

With the expiry of the child tax credit, this progress is now in jeopardy.

“I wouldn’t say it negates the gains,” Chamberlain said. “It eliminates our ability to continue to get those gains.”

During the months families received the credit, they had more food, stable housing, less stress — and greater developmental benefits for children.

“If they can keep expanding that, we can keep seeing that happen.”

The program’s immediate success is proof of concept, particularly because it’s unusual for a single policy to show such clear cut gains, Curran said.

“We’ve shown now that all of this – high poverty, rising poverty – is completely reversible,” she said. “We now know what works, and we’ve seen it work.”

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Columban Contest Winning Paper: “The Sisterhood of Intersectionality” https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/columban-contest-winning-paper-the-sisterhood-of-intersectionality/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 13:41:01 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/columban-contest-winning-paper-the-sisterhood-of-intersectionality/ Jessica Saxon Jessica Saxon, from St George’s College, Weybridge, won first prize for UK entries in the Columban Schools Competition on the topic: ‘Everyone Can Make a Difference: 21st Century Changemakers’. She wrote about American politician and Catholic Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, described by a judge as “barnstorming writing”, and she was encouraged to enter by her […]]]>

Jessica Saxon

Jessica Saxon, from St George’s College, Weybridge, won first prize for UK entries in the Columban Schools Competition on the topic: ‘Everyone Can Make a Difference: 21st Century Changemakers’. She wrote about American politician and Catholic Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, described by a judge as “barnstorming writing”, and she was encouraged to enter by her ER teacher, Mr. McAndrew. Jessica says, “Only by those who are brave enough – people like AOC and the person I want to be – can we inspire young minds to stand up for equality for all.”

Maybe it was in Malay class when someone asked me if I was Chinese because my eyes were thin and long. Or maybe it was in RE when all the boys in my class protested after I claimed one of my peers was sexist for implying that all women want to show off and seek male validation. Or even when a man three times my age had trapped me in the corner of a restaurant sitting at the edge of my booth discussing Harry Potter – he definitely had no other ideas, no. is this not ? It wasn’t until 2020 that I really understood the fact that I was going to be targeted for the rest of my life because of my skin color and gender.

Overwhelmed, I spent a few months keeping my thoughts to myself because I didn’t want the boys to hate me. That’s until I realized that I was just proving my classmate RE’s point: I was looking for the approval of the boys in my class despite the fact that they were just people who didn’t. had never learned differently in a social stratification steeped in patriarchal ideologies. Three months later, I had entered the pandemic fearing that it would hamper my ability to develop my critical thinking and prevent me from scratching the plot itch I had, silently feeding in the back of my mind ever since. that I am a child – I was completely wrong.

I had discovered Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. She is not a feminist but rather someone who explores white superiority institutionalized within mainstream feminism and strives to develop it further into a modern movement filled with justice for every woman. She strives to recruit girls from a young age to help build a global understanding of intersectional feminism, hoping to shape Gen Z to bring young minds into people who stand against white male expectations. and able-bodied cis-hets who lived centuries ago.

In an impassioned speech regarding explicit biases within medicine, Ocasio-Cortez referenced her religious faith, opposing the rationale for neglecting people of one race, sex, or race. different sexuality. Referring to the abuse of power that prevails behind religious freedom in the United States, she states, “the only time religious freedom is invoked is in the name of bigotry and discrimination.” In one sentence, Ocasio-Cortez is able to highlight the history of discriminatory gaslighting within the American healthcare industry, although it touches on a global spectrum. Janice A. Sabin, PhD, a University of Washington professor who studies implicit biases in health care, tells Today in an article — about the dismissal that floods the medical care black women receive — that “pain is an area of ​​implicit bias”. have an impact because it’s an extremely subject area.” Ocasio-Cortez acknowledges this and draws attention to its inequitable nature.

She points to the fact that some “defenders” have done this before and used religious liberty to account for other horrific events in history. “It’s very hard to sit here and listen to the arguments of this country’s long history of using scripture, weaponizing and abusing scripture, to justify bigotry. White supremacists have done it , those who justified slavery did it, those who fought against integration did that, and we see it today.” I think his way of expressing himself is one of the best. She reflects on her own personal beliefs to logically manipulate arguments, manifesting the rationale behind her reasoning, while acknowledging that her counterparts may disagree, repeatedly beginning her sentences with “In my faith…” She expands on the idea that all people are sacred in their own right and should be treated with the same respect that she wishes to be treated with herself. “There is nothing sacred about rejecting medical care from people, no matter who they are, because of their identity. There is nothing sacred about dismissing someone from a hospital. There is nothing sacred about rejecting a child from a family. There is nothing sacred about writing discrimination into law.”

Ocasio-Cortez carries herself with a certain elegance and speaks with such sincerity, convincing onlookers that she is right. She takes matters into her own hands and takes the bliss (Matthew 5:6) “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied”, to another level as she continually gathers women around the world to be one part of the intersectionality fellowship, leaving no one behind. What elevates the power that Ocasio-Cortez exudes, in my opinion, is her ability to draw direct attention to people who confronted her in problematic and immature ways. In a speech combating misogyny, Ocasio-Cortez denounces a former President of the United States for approaching her with racially motivated remarks, “…the President of the United States last year told me to to go home to another country with the implication that I don’t even belong in America.”

By doing this, Ocasio-Cortez actively encourages others to uplift. She encourages others to speak out against their injustices, in a special language that tells women their stories are worth telling. It raises awareness of a multitude of socio-economic issues and proves that women have something to say and that they can say it. She greatly inspired me – and many others – and I would be grateful to have even a little of her bravery and confidence.

If Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez can overcome every woman’s worst nightmare and survive, who says I can’t either?

Key words: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Columban Competition, Jessica Saxon, St George’s College, Weybridge

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Is the AAP ready to replace the Congress as India’s national opposition? https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/is-the-aap-ready-to-replace-the-congress-as-indias-national-opposition/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 13:00:20 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/is-the-aap-ready-to-replace-the-congress-as-indias-national-opposition/ A landslide victory in Punjab propelled the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) from ruling a “glorified municipality” to becoming the fifth Indian party to successfully expand beyond its home state and gain another state. The AAP now governs two states, as many as Congress. As Congress grapples with an existential crisis after the dismal electoral record […]]]>

A landslide victory in Punjab propelled the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) from ruling a “glorified municipality” to becoming the fifth Indian party to successfully expand beyond its home state and gain another state. The AAP now governs two states, as many as Congress.

As Congress grapples with an existential crisis after the dismal electoral record of winning just five of 50 state assemblies up for grabs since 2014 and being routed in two consecutive national elections, the success of the AAP to sweep another state has raised whispers that the AAP is the possible “national and natural replacement for Congress”.

As the AAP takes the heels of Congress in Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Karnataka and beyond, here are five reasons why the party could well replace Congress as India’s national opposition.

‘Alternative governance’ agenda captures voters’ hopes

The Indian state, despite its stability, has lagged behind in creating economic growth and jobs, reducing hunger, malnutrition and poverty and has seemingly given up on providing health care and food. education, ensuring urban governance, gender parity and reduced social stratification, etc.

Such failures provide extraordinary leeway for reforms that address these critical issues and thereby create new electoral bases for a party.

Yet existing parties, particularly Congress, have failed to offer an alternative paradigm. As such, we the people have been content with the familiar trope of being “too populous to be well governed”. A sense of hopeless status quo and a lack of imagination have permeated our approach to most public policy issues.

A Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) government is barely distinguishable from a Congress government, especially in the states, as the famous Arun Shourie so aptly put it. “The BJP is Congress plus the cow,” he said.

Congress has become a prisoner of its own heritage, upholding archaic structures and laws, unable to free itself from outdated approaches to governance. He remains convinced of his sense of right and seems content to wait his turn as an opposition, to be elected to power because of a possible anti-incumbent. This right and convenience is why Congress does not have a marketable governance model for states, unlike the AAP model in Delhi and the BJP model in Gujarat.

In such a vacuum, the PAA offers an alternative form of governance that lowers the cost of living and increases the disposable incomes of ordinary people through innovations in welfarism; improves opportunities for the upliftment and dignified existence of the poor through reformed public health and education systems; improves service delivery through the use of technology and updated delivery structures, such as door-to-door service delivery and provisions for universal water supply and sewerage access.

Through these steps, the party has thoughtfully identified unmet voter needs, challenged itself to meet them, and thereby created a sustainable voter base that transcends former voting blocs. It is this enduring base that explains why the AAP, after gaining a foothold in one state, sweeps it and thus can defeat Congress in other states as well.

Solves the riddle of the BJP’s ‘Hindu’ and nationalist appeal

The BJP’s success under Modi against the Congress was underscored by the party’s success in defining the Congress as “anti-Hindu” and “anti-national”, thus making the Congress a pariah for a significant portion of voters. The BJP keeps these voters consolidated by constantly stirring the cultural and social pot and appropriating the mantle of “protector of the national and Hindu interest”. Due to the emotive appeal of Hindutva and nationalism, the BJP has created a bond with voters that has grown immune to governance failures.

The AAP has managed to navigate this minefield with innocuous symbolism, such as temple visits, one-crore fees for martyrs, tiranga yatras, and the Teerth Yatra yojana. He has also carefully avoided becoming entangled in cultural and religious debates that keep the body politic’s focus on cultural differences rather than governance issues.

While the AAP has received much criticism for pandering to the emotional needs of the people through the type of religious and nationalist symbolism that the BJP also uses, such criticism overlooks how a fractured political regime, where society is polarized on such conflicting issues, is not able to settle such debates. On the contrary, such challenges only distract us from focusing on the things that unite us and alienate the Liberals from a significant portion of voters.

Thus, the AAP has struck a balance where Hindus who feel alienated are brought back into the liberal fold by having their feelings publicly acknowledged and respected, neutralizing the sense of victimization that the BJP has carefully nurtured among Hindus and thus allowing elections to be fought over issues of governance.

A charismatic and competent leader

The AAP gains another point against Congress by comparing the attractiveness of its leaders; Arvind Kejriwal versus Rahul Gandhi.

Gandhi has held no governance post and is unable to inspire voters’ confidence in his ability to govern, while Kejriwal served as chief minister three times and was re-elected based on his governance record.

Kejriwal is also a much more powerful organization builder and a more persuasive public speaker. Moreover, Gandhi was systematically demonized and as a result is widely seen as the incompetent representative of a corrupt dynasty in decline responsible for the corruption and nepotism that frustrated the aspirations of the common man, creating sentiment among the voters of a lack of alternatives to Modi.

By contrast, Kejriwal is seen as a self-made man who passed both the IIT and civil service entrance exams; won a Magsaysay Award for Social Services; and is a renowned anti-corruption crusader. This makes him better placed to emerge as a face of opposition behind whom the public can unite and credibly challenge Modi.

Mastery of the “new-age electoral campaign”

In the competition for national opposition space, the AAP has another ace up its sleeve: its mastery of new-age election campaigning.

The AAP has a dominating presence on various social media platforms; ostensibly has a better understanding of search algorithms; has more passionate online volunteers; and has innovative multimedia messaging that allows it to disproportionately define the narrative online – and subsequently, offline; a task with which Congress often finds itself confronted.

In fact, Congress, the original “godfather” of welfare policy and the party behind India’s 1991 reforms, is unable to claim ownership of either over the BJP due to the construction superior narrative of the latter.

A combat-ready group with a mission

The Congress is run by leaders and volunteers who are demoralized, uninspired and out of step with the expectations of the people. The party has become impoverished despite the enrichment of its leaders. It has failed to attract new talent as its own leaders abandon it to launch their own parties or join its rivals.

In contrast, the AAP has an army of loyal and dedicated young volunteers, with unwavering faith in the party’s mission. It helps her create a buzz and win the perception battle.

The rise of the AAP has not been without its share of failures. He was left for dead after the Lok Sabha debacle in 2014, then again after the disappointing results of the 2017 Assembly elections in Punjab and finally, after the Lok Sabha washout in 2019 where he won only only one seat. Yet, due to an indomitable fighting spirit, the AAP has risen like a Phoenix from the ashes after each defeat.

Pushed against the wall, she reinvents herself, appeals to a new electoral base, launches with all her might and outflanks her better-off rivals in battles of perception, without being intimidated or shouting.

This fighting spirit is ultimately what can help the AAP unseat the bickering, exhausted, worn-out, decaying Congress that often dies in states where it is pushed into third place. And it is this fighting spirit that may make the BJP wary of the AAP’s emergence as its main rival, ending its dream streak of easy victories over Congress.

With the strong AAP at the forefront, the opposition could finally find its voice, a proposition that should only appeal to the AAP even more with opposition voters.

Praneet Pathak studied marketing at IMT and is a keen observer of Indian democracy.

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Obesity, a growing burden for society https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/obesity-a-growing-burden-for-society/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 18:51:34 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/obesity-a-growing-burden-for-society/ Muscat – Physical inactivity and poor diet are the main causes of the increase in obesity in the sultanate, especially among women. The Department of Health, represented by the National Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology at the Royal Hospital Branch and the Non-Communicable Diseases Unit at the Primary Health Care Branch, on Wednesday organized a […]]]>

Muscat – Physical inactivity and poor diet are the main causes of the increase in obesity in the sultanate, especially among women.

The Department of Health, represented by the National Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology at the Royal Hospital Branch and the Non-Communicable Diseases Unit at the Primary Health Care Branch, on Wednesday organized a workshop to discuss regional recommendations for the treatment and management of adult obesity in the Gulf and Lebanon in collaboration with the World Obesity Federation.

The virtual event was held under the auspices of HE Dr. Ahmed bin Mohammed al Sa’eedi, Minister of Health.

The workshop aimed to review the recently launched regional recommendations for the treatment and management of obesity in adults in the Arab Gulf region and Lebanon, launched in October 2020, and discuss its implementation in Oman, according to a press release issued by the ministry. .

Participants discussed all aspects of obesity management service delivery in Oman, including current opportunities and challenges. The workshop was also an opportunity for all participants to establish realistic steps to improve the treatment and management of adult obesity in Oman.

Professor John Wilding, President of the World Obesity Federation, spoke about the growing burden of obesity worldwide and discussed the federation’s efforts to raise awareness and introduce feasible interventions to reduce this burden.

In his speech, H.E. Dr. Sa’eedi highlighted the rising rates of obesity in Oman, especially among women, and the growing burden on society due to increased risk factors, especially physical inactivity. and poor diet.

He also highlighted the important role the health sector plays in ensuring the development of a clear and integrated pathway that will help break down the social stigma of obesity and encourage patients to seek much-needed help. .

In 2017, the National Survey of Non-Communicable Diseases reported that 66% of Oman’s population was overweight and obese. The prevalence of obesity in the sultanate has risen to 23.2% among men and 39.3% among women. The statistics also indicated the increasing incidence of obesity and overweight among children and those in younger age groups.

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Remembering Paul Farmer, a healer and guide https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/remembering-paul-farmer-a-healer-and-guide/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 22:04:49 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/remembering-paul-farmer-a-healer-and-guide/ My mother says those who die in their sleep are divine. Dr. Paul Edward Farmer died Monday in his sleep. He was only 62 years old. He had devoted his life to improving the health of the poorest. A physician by profession, he was also a trained anthropologist, prolific writer and professor at Kolokotrones University […]]]>

My mother says those who die in their sleep are divine. Dr. Paul Edward Farmer died Monday in his sleep. He was only 62 years old. He had devoted his life to improving the health of the poorest. A physician by profession, he was also a trained anthropologist, prolific writer and professor at Kolokotrones University and chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He was co-founder of the non-profit organization Partners in Health (PIH).

I have never met Farmer but have followed his work, writings, interviews and other material that emerged from his years of work in Haiti, Rwanda and impoverished areas of West Africa . His death is devastating news for the small global tribe of doctors and healthcare workers who defied capitalist greed and dedicated their lives to the poor and disadvantaged. Farmer was the beacon of this dying tribe.

As a trained anthropologist, Farmer had a knack for asking simple but important questions that peeled back the layers of social stratification. Many of his books have revealed how poverty works in the modern world. It amazed him how ordinary people in countries like Nicaragua, El Salvador and Haiti were able to put their lives on the line for dignity and social justice. His latest book Fever, Feuds and Diamonds: Ebola and the Ravages of History (2020), discusses the Ebola epidemic in West Africa and traces the origins of this region’s neglected health care to centuries of domination. colonial. This ability to logically trace the epidemic to an end point in the region’s colonial history shows a teacher mastering his talent and capable of revealing the “visibly invisible” to his students.

That said, the massive but significant web of Paul Farmer, the author, is extremely difficult to keep up with. His books deal not only with the sociopolitics of health care, but also with spirituality, liberation theology, hope, political economy, and even culture and society. His book Infections and Inequalities not only examined the link between poverty and disease, but also revealed how developed countries like the United States treat poor “invisible countries” like Haiti. His articles on tuberculosis and HIV are an important medical resource for physicians. Mountains Beyond Mountains, her biography by Tracy Kidder, is an inspiring book that all aspiring doctors should read. In Pathologies of Power, Farmer addressed disparities in access to existing medical technologies.

With the Covid-19 outbreak tearing the world’s health systems apart and opening gaping holes in our interpretation of public health care, Farmer’s work becomes a beacon, especially for resource-limited settings like India. . He believed that the social construction of epidemics and the lived experience of illness are very different and that poverty is not an accident of nature but the result of historically determined and economically driven forces. In India, many of us work in facilities that have been called “clinical deserts” by Farmer. These are hospitals without the tools of the trade. Farmer asked if such clinical deserts could be irrigated and concluded that they could. He believed that if a MASH hospital can be built next to a battlefield, then one can certainly be built after the battle is over – for example, in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Peru or Guatemala after the civil war. He believed in pragmatic solidarity with health partners.

Kidder writes in Mountains Beyond Mountains that during a trip to Cuba, Farmer revealed that he did not believe in Marxism but that he loved the then Cuban President Fidel Castro, mainly for the protection of the sick and the people. vulnerable. He writes that when they finally arrived at their hotel in Havana, Farmer said, “I can sleep here. Here, everyone has a doctor.

As Farmer sleeps eternally, it is the responsibility of each of us to ensure his legacy is maintained. Let’s promise him that everyone on this planet will have a doctor.

The author is Professor, Department of Orthopaedics, AIIMS, New Delhi

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Chiquita Brooks-LaSure Makes History Among White House’s Most Diverse Administrations https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/chiquita-brooks-lasure-makes-history-among-white-houses-most-diverse-administrations/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 14:58:48 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/chiquita-brooks-lasure-makes-history-among-white-houses-most-diverse-administrations/ Chiquita Brooks-LaSure A White House photo featuring dozens of African-American members of the Biden-Harris administration circulated the internet during the early days of Black History Month, and it would be hard to find anyone. as proud as Chiquita Brooks-LaSure. The first black woman to lead the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Brooks-LaSure offered […]]]>
Chiquita Brooks-LaSure

A White House photo featuring dozens of African-American members of the Biden-Harris administration circulated the internet during the early days of Black History Month, and it would be hard to find anyone. as proud as Chiquita Brooks-LaSure.

The first black woman to lead the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Brooks-LaSure offered the brightest smile as she mentioned the historic photo featuring Vice President Kamala Harris and a host of black staff members helping to advance the work of the administration.

“I’m so proud and really moved,” said Philadelphia-born Brooks-LaSure.

“When I was nominated, I heard from women across the country, and I hadn’t realized how meaningful it would be to so many people for me to sit in that chair,” he said. she continued. “I have older women and younger women coming to tell me how proud they are. It really inspires me to want to use this role in a way that changes people’s lives, and I’m so grateful for the opportunity.

“The National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) wholeheartedly salutes and congratulates Chiquita Brooks-LaSure for her outstanding leadership at CMS Health and Human Services (HHS).

We look forward to expanding the partnership between CMS and NNPA. Medicare and Medicaid are vital to the present and future of African Americans and other communities of color,” said Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr, President and CEO of NNPA.

A former politician who played a crucial role in guiding the Affordable Care Act — or Obamacare — through passage and implementation, Brooks-LaSure benefits from decades of experience working in government. and the private sector. As deputy director of policy at the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight, and earlier at the Department of Health & Human Services as director of coverage policy, Brooks-LaSure led the agency’s implementation policy provisions and Obamacare coverage. She helped House of Representatives leaders pass several health care laws, including the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008, on the Democratic staff of the Committee on ways and means of the House.

As a CMS administrator, Brooks-LaSure oversees programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program and the HealthCare.gov health insurance marketplace.

“I was born in Philadelphia, raised in New Jersey and lived in Virginia for much of my life,” said LaSure, who is married and has a young daughter. “I’ve always been interested in politics from an early age,” she explained. “When I was in graduate school, I had a friend who I took classes with in health policy and social policy, and she really put me on the path to health policy. J I’ve always said, “Once you start health, you never look back, because no policy area has the capacity to touch so many lives, especially in the federal government.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased pressure on CMS and other agencies, but Brooks-La-Sure recalled similarities to the coming into force of the ACA. “The ACA was born out of a difficult time,” she recalls. “Before we passed the law, not everyone thought we should focus on health policy. We had the Great Recession, and one of the elements of people’s financial security was health care, because one in three bankruptcies resulted from medical expenses. So it became imperative to pass the ACA, and I think we are at the same time today. The pandemic has made it harder to do so much with health policy. »

Brooks-LaSure said Americans now have a better understanding of why health care is vital and why the uninsured and those without access to vaccines and drug treatments affect everyone. “I think people saw health disparities on a different level,” she said. “I think we now have the opportunity to address these [disparities] if we seize this moment.

To that end, Brooks-LaSure noted the six strategic pillars by which CMS would achieve its mission and measure success:

• Advance health equity by
tackling the health disparities that underpin America
health system
• Build on the affordable
Care and Expanding Access Act
affordable and quality health
coverage and care
• Engage partners and the
communities served by CMS
throughout the process of policy development and implementation • Stimulate innovation to tackle
health system challenges
and promote the value,
person-centred care
• Protect CMS’ programs
sustainability for future generations by acting as a responsible steward to the public
funds
• Foster a positive and inclusive work environment and
workforce and promote
excellence in all aspects of
CMS operations

Brooks-LaSure said CMS has already made significant progress on these pillars, focusing its efforts on improving health equity and access to coverage by working across federal agencies. She told NNPA Newswire that a record 14.5 million people signed up for 2022 health care coverage during the enrollment period. “Investing in financial assistance and awareness helps more people access the care they need,” Brooks-LaSure said.

As part of Vice President Kamala Harris’ call to action to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity, HHS, through CMS, has taken steps to improve maternal health and support the delivery equitable and high-quality care for pregnancy and postpartum care. CMS has proposed a “Birthing-Friendly” designation to support perinatal health outcomes and improved maternal health equity. According to a statement, the designation would initially identify hospitals that provide perinatal care, participate in a maternity care quality improvement collaboration and implement recommended patient safety practices.

CMS also encouraged states to take advantage of the American Rescue Plan’s option to provide 12 months of postpartum coverage to pregnant women enrolled in Medicaid or CHIP.

Brooks-LaSure said history would eventually smile on the unprecedented diversity. “I think representation is so important, and we will have changed this country because so many of us are in these roles with our diverse perspectives that strengthen policy-making,” Brooks-La-Sure said. “The more people you have who come from different backgrounds, you build stronger and better policies and make sure the next generation sees they can fill those roles.”

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Former Nixon adviser to speak at Montana Club event | Local https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/former-nixon-adviser-to-speak-at-montana-club-event-local/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 21:14:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/former-nixon-adviser-to-speak-at-montana-club-event-local/ John Roy Price, senior domestic policy adviser to President Richard Nixon, will discuss his new book “The Last Liberal Republican: An Insider’s Perspective on Nixon’s Surprising Social Policy” during a dinner and book signing Feb. 23 at the Montana Club. The event, which Price says will be more of a back and forth discussion than […]]]>

John Roy Price, senior domestic policy adviser to President Richard Nixon, will discuss his new book “The Last Liberal Republican: An Insider’s Perspective on Nixon’s Surprising Social Policy” during a dinner and book signing Feb. 23 at the Montana Club.

The event, which Price says will be more of a back and forth discussion than a speech, is part of the Montana Club’s Library Collection series.

Price, 83, said in a phone interview that the book culminated from events he was involved in 50 years ago at the Nixon White House, and thought if he didn’t write the book soon, he might not be able to do it.

Price had been part of the more liberal and progressive wing of the Republican Party and was part of Nelson Rockefeller’s presidential campaign when he was recruited to serve in the Nixon White House. He was there from 1969 to 1971, before Watergate prompted the president to resign.

“It was a crucial time that I went through as a youngster,” he said.

People also read…

The book is by University Press of Kansas, June 2021.

Price offers details on the extent to which Nixon and his team have straddled a precarious balance between a Democratic-controlled Congress and an increasingly powerful conservative tide in Republican politics.

He said that Nixon, like Republicans Thomas Dewey and Dwight Eisenhower, was moving toward “big tent republicanism and the completion of a safety net for Americans who lacked the opportunities that many of got us”.

Price joined Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and later John D. Ehrlichman, in the Nixon White House to develop national policies, particularly on welfare, hunger, and health.






President Richard Nixon speaks during a White House press briefing in Washington.


Associated press


Price also said watching Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, is reminiscent of Nixon, who had wanted universal health care.

“Richard Nixon offered to cover pre-existing conditions 40 years before the Affordable Care Act,” Price said, adding that the president, who wanted to hear everyone’s opinions, had “a whole range of instincts from his left and it resonated with me”.

“There was a serious intelligence at work on politics sitting at that desk that I came to respect,” he said. “He had a basic sense of civility and empathy. I would see it in small ways.”

Price said the Republican Party, until fairly recently, had developed serious policy and felt the federal government had a role to play in helping those on the margins. He would like to see this return.

“Let’s at least look carefully at the political questions and the social sciences that might help us get answers,” he said. “Let’s not get stuck like Gulliver. Let’s go back to policy making.

Price recalled Pat Buchanan, a Nixon special aide who tried to have Price fired, once told him, “We (the hard right) win political battles but you (putting his finger in Price’s backhand) win. political battles. ”

Price, who re-signed as an independent, offers a unique perspective on the presidency of Nixon, who lamented that he was only remembered for Watergate and China.

“And he’s pretty much right,” Price said.

Price and his family divide their time between Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Livingston, Montana.

He is a co-founder of the Ripon Society, a public policy organization founded in 1962. It takes its name from Ripon, Wisconsin, the town where the Republican Party was born in 1854. One of its goals is to promote ideas and principles that, according to its website, “made America great and contributed to the success of the GOP.”

The February 23 event begins with a meeting at 5:30 p.m. and dinner at 6 p.m. Tickets are $45 per guest.

To register, go to: https://montanaclub.coop/events-purchase-page/the-library-collection-february-23rd.

For more questions, call 406-442-5980.

Associate Editor Phil Drake can be reached at 406-231-9021.

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Poor pre-pregnancy cardiometabolic health observed in the United States https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/poor-pre-pregnancy-cardiometabolic-health-observed-in-the-united-states/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 19:15:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/poor-pre-pregnancy-cardiometabolic-health-observed-in-the-united-states/ Geography serves as a marker for broader socioeconomic and racial gaps, which public health policies and efforts can curb. More than half of women who gave birth in the United States in 2019 had poor cardiometabolic health, and time trends suggest the situation is getting worse, according to research published Monday in a special issue […]]]>

Geography serves as a marker for broader socioeconomic and racial gaps, which public health policies and efforts can curb.

More than half of women who gave birth in the United States in 2019 had poor cardiometabolic health, and time trends suggest the situation is getting worse, according to research published Monday in a special issue of Go Red for Women. Traffic.

With many studies linking pregnancy complications like preeclampsia and gestational diabetes to worse long-term cardiovascular outcomesthe researchers say improving the overall health of women before they become pregnant should be a priority for policy makers and primary care clinicians.

The researchers say that while this is a significant problem across the United States, it may be particularly important to target states where a low percentage of women enter pregnancy in ideal cardiometabolic health. Hopefully, future efforts can “identify factors that may contribute to this, such as access to health care, access to healthy food and green spaces, and neighborhood safety,” lead author Natalie A. Cameron, MD (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL), told TCTMD.

Geography as a surrogate marker

Using maternal birth records from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers identified more than 14 million women ages 20 to 44 who gave birth in the U.S. between 2016 and 2019. Good health cardiac (defined as a body mass index of 18.0 to 24.9 kg/m2 without hypertension or diabetes) averaged lowest in the Southern (38.1%) and Midwestern (38.8%) states and highest in the West (42.2%) and Northeast (43.6%).

Commenting on the study, Vesna Garovic, MD, PhD (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN), told TCTMD that “geography really serves as a surrogate marker for socioeconomic status, education, and racial disparities in delivery of maternal health care, which differs from state to state. The same states that have these unfavorable profiles for pregnancy in the United States have unfavorable cardiometabolic profiles for the general population, which kind of has implications again important for overall health. But for pregnant women in particular, who are stressed by weight, lipid changes and fluid retention, the implications are more pronounced, she added.

Cameron was surprised to see such a low percentage of women entering pregnancy with good cardiometabolic health, which overall declined from 43.5% in 2016 to 40.2% in 2019. “I thought that number was pretty low. given that these are women of childbearing age,” she said. “We looked at women ages 20 to 44, but that’s still young enough to only have 40% of them entering pregnancy with favorable cardiometabolic health.”

Notably, 81.4% of the population was between 20 and 34 years old. Overall, 22.7% were Hispanic/Latin, 14% were non-Hispanic black, and 52.7% were non-Hispanic white. Although the database used for the study did not include any post-pregnancy data, the researchers observed an inverse correlation between favorable cardiometabolic health and a high school diploma or less, as well as with Medicaid (P < 0.01 for both).

“There are certainly a lot more social and economic factors that we need to look at to help design policies,” Cameron said.

“At the individual patient level, we would like more women to see their primary care physician before pregnancy for regular check-ups to ensure they have normal blood pressure, do not have diabetes or prediabetes, that they’re not a smoker, and that they’re of normal weight so that their doctors can help them manage those conditions if they have any,” she added. “And that way they can help maximize the health of their pregnancy and their baby too.”

For patients who experience cardiometabolic complications during pregnancy, Cameron advised doctors to look for risk factors as early as possible “to try to optimize them for the future pregnancy.” For those already entering pregnancy with poor cardiometabolic health, it’s never too late to make improvements, she said.

Garovic said healthy diet and exercise are important, but doctors need to work with women who want to start a family in a timely manner so they are healthy when they become pregnant.

Unfortunately, the data suggests “that what was bad is getting worse,” she added, noting, however, that “it may be the population that is particularly motivated to pursue these lifestyle changes in order to ‘achieve their reproductive goals’.

Going forward, Garovic would like research to focus on identifying markers of preclinical abnormalities associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease beyond what is currently included in typical risk factor stratification. “Pre-pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes may play a role in how we assess overall risk, but unfortunately at this stage, even though we are aware that pregnancy complications may increase their risk of heart disease and stroke, these are not factored in and calculated into traditional risk scores,” she said.

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The College of Professional Advancement organizes the international conference Narrative Matters in the United States https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-college-of-professional-advancement-organizes-the-international-conference-narrative-matters-in-the-united-states/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 18:31:13 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-college-of-professional-advancement-organizes-the-international-conference-narrative-matters-in-the-united-states/ ATLANTA — The College of Professional Advancement at Mercer University will host the 10th Narrative Matters Conference, a biennial interdisciplinary conference May 16-19, to be held in the United States for the first time. Scholars and practitioners from around the world will gather at Mercer’s Cecil B. Day campus in Atlanta to explore themes related […]]]>

ATLANTA — The College of Professional Advancement at Mercer University will host the 10th Narrative Matters Conference, a biennial interdisciplinary conference May 16-19, to be held in the United States for the first time.

Scholars and practitioners from around the world will gather at Mercer’s Cecil B. Day campus in Atlanta to explore themes related to storytelling and their power to move and transform people intellectually, emotionally, morally, spiritually. and politics, among others.

“We are thrilled to welcome such an accomplished and diverse group of scholars, researchers and practitioners and to expand the reach of narrative ideas in the Mercer community and beyond,” said Dr. Don Redmond, Associate Professor consultant and director of Mercer’s Center for the Study of Narrative.

Several pre-conference workshops will take place on Monday, May 16, followed by three days of speakers, sessions and poster presentations. Festivities include an opening reception at the Center for Civil and Human Rights on Tuesday, May 17 at 7 p.m.

Keynote speakers at the conference include Pulitzer Prize and National Humanities Medal winner Isabel Wilkerson and renowned professor of psychology, human development and social policy at Northwestern University, Dr. Dan McAdams.

Isabelle Wilkerson

Wilkerson’s first work, The warmth of other sunswon the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heartland Prize for Nonfiction, the Anisfield-Wolf Award for Nonfiction, the Lynton History Prize from Harvard and Columbia Universities, and the Stephen Ambrose Oral History Prize, and was shortlisted for the Pen-Galbraith Prize literature and the Dayton Literary Prize for Peace.

A native of Washington, DC, she won the Pulitzer Prize for Feature Writing in 1994 as the Chicago bureau chief of The New York Times, becoming the first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize in journalism. She then dedicated 15 years and interviewed over 1,200 people to telling the story of the 6 million people, including her parents, who defected from the Jim Crow South.

Wilkerson’s new book, Caste: the origins of our discontentwas acclaimed by venerable British bookseller Waterstone’s as an “expansive, lyrical and moving account of the unspoken system of divisions that governs our world”.

Dr. Dan McAdams
Dr. Dan McAdams

Dr. McAdams is the Henry Wade Rogers Professor of Psychology and Professor of Human Development and Social Policy at Northwestern.

He received his Bachelor of Science from the University of Valparaiso in 1976 and his Ph.D. in Psychology and Social Relations from Harvard University in 1979.

Honored as the Charles Deering McCormick Professor of Teaching Excellence at Northwestern, Dr. McAdams teaches courses in personality psychology, adult development and aging, personality and developmental theories, and literatures of life. identity and generativity.

While any discipline can find a connection to Narrative Matters, previous conferences have had speakers from the fields of nursing, education, gerontology, theology, law, medicine and many social science disciplines.

Within Mercer’s Center for the Study of Narrative and College of Professional Advancement, professors of counseling, history, science, sociology of religion, journalism, creative writing, and mathematics conducted research and funded outreach activities related to storytelling.

The Center for the Study of Narrative is a multidisciplinary initiative housed within the College of Professional Advancement incorporating counseling, theology, psychology, sociology, and literary studies, among others. Collaborating faculty and students emphasize qualitative research methods and “listening to stories” to study the lives of individuals and larger populations.

About Career Advancement College

The College of Professional Advancement at Mercer University is committed to serving post-traditional learners. Undergraduate, graduate and certificate programs are offered to adult learners who seek to advance professionally into leadership roles in and beyond their communities. The programs provide students with distinctive multidisciplinary experiences that integrate theory and practice. In addition to providing general education and electives for various Mercer colleges and schools, the College of Professional Advancement offers degree programs in areas such as technology, public safety, public and social services, leadership and administration, health care and the liberal arts. Programs are offered at Mercer campuses in Atlanta and Macon, as well as regional college centers in Douglas and Henry counties, and online. To learn more, visit professionaladvancement.mercer.edu.

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Thumbs up for the proposed smoking restrictions https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/thumbs-up-for-the-proposed-smoking-restrictions/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/thumbs-up-for-the-proposed-smoking-restrictions/ PETALING JAYA: As expected, the smoking cessation proposal received broad support from health professionals. However, as one pointed out, it is still in its infancy and issues such as enforcement will need to be given due consideration before any legislation is introduced. Malaysian Medical Association (MMA) President Dr. Koh Kar Chai said the move could […]]]>

PETALING JAYA: As expected, the smoking cessation proposal received broad support from health professionals.

However, as one pointed out, it is still in its infancy and issues such as enforcement will need to be given due consideration before any legislation is introduced.

Malaysian Medical Association (MMA) President Dr. Koh Kar Chai said the move could significantly reduce the many health problems and co-morbidity problems caused by smoking in future generations.

Last week, Health Minister Khairy Jamaluddin announced that the government plans to table tobacco and tobacco control legislation during the next Dewan Rakyat session.

Currently, tobacco products are covered by the Food Act 1983.

The proposal follows a recent decision by the New Zealand government to ban the sale of tobacco to anyone born after 2008.

Under Kiwi law, anyone 14 and under today will never be able to legally purchase tobacco products during their lifetime.

Singapore is also considering a similar proposal.

Applauding the decision, Koh pointed out that there is overwhelming evidence to show that smoking is detrimental to health.

“It’s a step in the right direction. At MMA, we have been advocating for a smoke-free Malaysia and we have run many anti-smoking campaigns. It’s good to see progress now,” he said. the sun.

Koh said there should be support from both sides of the aisle when the bill is tabled for debate in Dewan Rakyat.

Tobacco use is a major health problem in Malaysia, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

According to the 2020 report of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, Malaysians start smoking at an early age. One in five Malaysians is a smoker and 21.3% of smokers start smoking at the age of 15.

The cost of health care is also staggering. Malaysia is expected to spend RM7.4 billion to cover the cost of treating smoking-related diseases, such as lung cancer and heart disease, by 2025, according to WHO estimates.

Koh stressed that point-of-sale enforcement must be strict to ensure cigarettes are not sold to minors.

He noted that anti-smuggling measures should also be in place to ensure that tobacco products and other similar addictive substances do not slip into Malaysia.

Besides criminalizing the sale of cigarettes to an entire generation, Koh said, education can also serve as a powerful way to discourage young people from taking up the habit.

“With greater awareness of smoking-caused diseases, the danger of second-hand smoke, and the high cost of treating smoking-related diseases, I think young people might be discouraged from lighting up,” he said. declared.

He also urged the government to continue raising taxes on cigarettes in a bid to price these items beyond the reach of the younger generation.

“The tax collected can then be used to cover the cost of public health care,” he added.

Azrul Mohd Khalib, director of the Galen Center for Health and Social Policy, said such a move would pay dividends not only for the future generation, but also for those approaching the age of maturity today.

Like Koh, he sees a challenge in enforcing such legislation.

“How do you know if a person is legally authorized to buy cigarettes without presenting their identity card? Maybe we can ask customers to show an individualized QR code to prove their legitimacy,” Azrul said. the sun.

He said there should also be easier access to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), such as patches and gum, which have been successful in helping smokers kick the habit.

“It is essential that the government provides adequate support to those who want to quit smoking using evidence-based approaches such as NRT. Electronic cigarettes do not have the same track record in treating nicotine addiction,” he added.

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