young people – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 06:20:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-6-150x150.png young people – Sociology Eso Science http://www.sociologyesoscience.com/ 32 32 Deep Water, Gehraiyaan, and more raise morally troubling questions https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/deep-water-gehraiyaan-and-more-raise-morally-troubling-questions/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 06:20:32 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/deep-water-gehraiyaan-and-more-raise-morally-troubling-questions/ Indian cinema of old had clear lines of demarcation. We knew who was the villain or the vampire. He usually smoked and drank, and she played the seductress. The good man or woman rarely engaged in any of these activities. Take, for example, Hindi-speaking actor Pran. He huffed and played with his drinking glass. Not […]]]>

Indian cinema of old had clear lines of demarcation. We knew who was the villain or the vampire. He usually smoked and drank, and she played the seductress. The good man or woman rarely engaged in any of these activities. Take, for example, Hindi-speaking actor Pran. He huffed and played with his drinking glass. Not the noble hero. Padma Khanna or Helen would mock and tease the men. Not the heroine.

Granted, that dividing line wasn’t quite as sharp in Western cinema where good heroes took a whiff — like our famous Humphrey Bogart, who walked and talked in a whirlwind of smoke. But that was because smoking and drinking were normal, perfectly acceptable as a way of life in the West and even in some Far Eastern countries like Japan.

But now, cinema around the world is entering dangerous territory. He is considered morally degraded. One of the first films that shocked me was Woody Allen’s Match Point – yes Woody’s – in which the main man, Jonathan Rhys Meyers’ Chris Wilton, murders his lover, Nola Rice (Scarlett Johansson) when her demands begin to interfere with her marital happiness.

More recently, I was appalled when Alisha trial yoga teacher Deepika Padukone left her lover, Zain (Siddhant Chaturvedi) to drown at sea and get away in a motorboat! Jitesh of Rajat Kapoor portraying a business associate knows about this offense but agrees to keep it secret for a price.

More recently I watched Deep Water on Amazon Prime Video. It’s helmed by no less of an auteur than Adrian Lyne – who’s given us such splendid films as Fatal Attraction (with Glen Close and Michael Doughlas) and Indecent Proposal (with Robert Redford and Demi Moore).

Adapted from Patricia Highsmith’s 1957 novel, Deep Water despite having two brilliant actors – Ben Affleck and Ana De Armas – is not only hugely disappointing but incredibly amoral. Vic (Affleck) and Melinda (De Armas) have an open marriage, and she starts taking one lover after another (which I find him doing), and each of them disappears. Vic kills them. He drowns one of them in a pool with a loud party right in front of it. Another guy is taken to a remote wooded area and bludgeoned to death! Melinda suspects her husband of being behind it all, but ends up becoming an accomplice. wow.

The cops appear once and seem to investigate superficially. What joke!

Lyne can take refuge in the fact that he was following the source material. But, please, why would a good director take a novel like this for his work? A bad choice after a 20-year hiatus. Again, Charlie Macdowells’ Windfall on Netflix with Jason Segel and Lily Collins shows a married woman shooting her husband and an intruder, and walking away with a bag full of dollar bills. She shows no remorse, no scruples. Good!

Deep Water and Windfall – much like Match Point (where the police come across as bumbling idiots) and Gehraiyaan – raise morally troubling questions. We all know that cinema has a huge influence. The time was when teenagers sported Rajesh Khanna’s Guru Kurta. The time was when the boys had Dev Anand’s hairstyle. In Tamil Nadu, Rajnikanth’s ways are copied freely – and reverently.

In a scenario like this, the question is whether cinema should be so insensitive. Doesn’t he have a social responsibility? Should murderers and other criminals be allowed to pass unscathed on screen?

I’m not saying that every man or woman who watches Match Point or Gehraiyaan or Deep Wate or Windfall would be tempted to kill someone they find embarrassing. But the movies aren’t just watched by adults, but also by impressionable young people, who may like to imagine that murder and mayhem are perfectly normal social behaviors. They are not, and the cinema must understand this.

Read all the latest Ukraine-Russia war news, breaking news and live updates here.

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Dispersal order put in place at Millbrook, Southampton https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dispersal-order-put-in-place-at-millbrook-southampton/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 10:16:08 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/dispersal-order-put-in-place-at-millbrook-southampton/ A DISPERSAL order was put in place in Southampton last night in a bid to tackle ‘noisy and rude’ young people shouting abuse at residents. A teenager was arrested following anti-social behavior in Millbrook last night. Police reported a group of boys and girls lingering outside shops on Windermere Avenue outside Millbrook Towers. Officers asked […]]]>

A DISPERSAL order was put in place in Southampton last night in a bid to tackle ‘noisy and rude’ young people shouting abuse at residents.

A teenager was arrested following anti-social behavior in Millbrook last night.

Police reported a group of boys and girls lingering outside shops on Windermere Avenue outside Millbrook Towers.

Officers asked the group of teenagers to move to Mansel Park and away from the shops, but received “lots of smart responses and rude remarks”.

The teenagers continued to be loud, disruptive and shout abuse at residents using the stores.

The police decided to implement a dispersal order to give the police the power to remove young people from the area.

The group still refused to leave and other officers were called to the scene.

One person was arrested and three youths received dispersal notices.

In a social media post, a Force spokesperson said: “We were grateful to the parents of those we dispersed who supported us. They were disappointed and probably embarrassed that we had to take action there. .

“One parent was not so supportive and felt we were being overbearing. The video recorded by the officers present would not support those parents’ thoughts on this.

Daily Echo:

“The behavior of this group has caused intimidation, anxiety and fear to many people using the stores and passing through over the past few weeks.

“The frustration of other residents also translated into anger towards the youngsters.”

The dispersal zone is in place around the Millbrook towers and the shops on Windermere Avenue until 11.59pm tonight, March 13.

Anyone already dispersed from the area who returns during this time will be arrested and prosecuted.

Anyone in the area who causes or is likely to cause incivility or disturbance may be dispersed for the duration of the order.

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The two-week celebration of medical pioneer Elsie Inglis will be held in Edinburgh for the statue appeal https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-two-week-celebration-of-medical-pioneer-elsie-inglis-will-be-held-in-edinburgh-for-the-statue-appeal/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 04:58:48 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-two-week-celebration-of-medical-pioneer-elsie-inglis-will-be-held-in-edinburgh-for-the-statue-appeal/ Srailblazing doctor and surgeon Elsie Inglis will be honored with a new statue in Edinburgh if an ongoing campaign is successful. But it’s only now that pioneering physician and surgeon Elsie Inglis is on the verge of full recognition in her hometown. Plans for a two-week Edinburgh celebration of his life and legacy in Edinburgh […]]]>
Srailblazing doctor and surgeon Elsie Inglis will be honored with a new statue in Edinburgh if an ongoing campaign is successful.

But it’s only now that pioneering physician and surgeon Elsie Inglis is on the verge of full recognition in her hometown.

Plans for a two-week Edinburgh celebration of his life and legacy in Edinburgh have been unveiled as part of a fundraising campaign for a long-awaited statue.

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A campaign to honor the founder of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals service, who was rejected by the British War Office over her suggestion of female medical units, was launched five years ago to coincide with the centenary of his death.

Mothers and children demonstrate outside the Elsie Inglis Memorial Hospital in Edinburgh on the last day before it closed in October 1988. Photo: Denis Straughan

Led by the Edinburgh branch of the Girlguiding movement, the statue campaign won the crucial backing of the city’s Lord Provost, Frank Ross, and cross-party support in the City Council, in November.

It is hoped £50,000 will be raised from the next fundraising scheme to pay for a statue of Dr Inglis – whose organization was responsible for sending 14 medical teams to war zones across Europe – to be designed and erected on the Royal Mile.

Among those appearing will be BBC health editor Hugh Pym, historian Alastair Bruce, Governor of Edinburgh Castle and a councilor from Downtown Abbey, Sara Sheridan, author of the book Where Are The Women? which highlights the stories of ‘sidelined’ women in Scottish history, award-winning film and television producer Iram Qureshi and Linda Bauld, Professor of Public Health at the University of Edinburgh, who received much praise for his guidance during the pandemic.

Broadcaster Kirsty Wark, tennis coach Judy Murray, actress Gerda Stevenson and kilt maker Deirdre Kinloch Anderson are also backing a £50,000 appeal, which is backed by firms Mercat Tours and Edinburgh Gin.

Linda Bauld is Professor of Public Health at the University of Edinburgh and Senior Social Policy Advisor to the Scottish Government. Photo: Andrew Milligan

Highlights of the program of fundraising events, which will run from February 27 to March 13, include an exhibition of memorabilia from Scottish Women’s Hospitals at St Giles Cathedral, where Dr Inglis’ funeral was held in 1917 , a mass Girlguiding gathering on the meadows and a series of afternoon tea lectures in the City Chambers.

A walking tour of the city will highlight the achievements of Dr Inglis and the ‘Edinburgh Seven’ activists, the first female students to go to university in the UK.

A fundraising gala dinner at the downtown restaurant Dine and an International Women’s Day event at the French Institute in the city, hosted by Consul Laurence Pais are also being held.

Thea Laurie, co-founder of the Statue for Elsie campaign, said: “It captured the imagination, not just of women in Edinburgh, but of people in Edinburgh as well.

Sara Sheridan PIC: Aleksandra Modrzejewska

“We are delighted that the legendary and inspiring suffragist doctor, philanthropist and founder of Scottish Women’s Hospitals will be remembered forever.

“Young people all over Edinburgh hear her name and learn her story for the first time and ask for a statue for a woman.”

Girlguiding Edinburgh spokeswoman Susan Brown said: “The statue will provide a focal point for young women in Edinburgh to motivate them to find out more about this wonderful lady.

“We empower girls to learn about the world, form their own perspectives, speak out for the change they want to see, and fight for the key issues that matter to them, just like Elsie l ‘already done.”

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Carlisle mayor says ‘enough is enough’ after yet more reports of anti-social behavior https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/carlisle-mayor-says-enough-is-enough-after-yet-more-reports-of-anti-social-behavior/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/carlisle-mayor-says-enough-is-enough-after-yet-more-reports-of-anti-social-behavior/ CARLISLE Mayor Pam Birks said “enough is enough” when it comes to anti-social behavior in the city. His comments come after Cumbria Police attended an incident on Monday night in Scotch Street following yet more reports of anti-social behavior and criminal damage. Police were also seen patrolling The Lanes and Globe Street following anti-social behavior […]]]>

CARLISLE Mayor Pam Birks said “enough is enough” when it comes to anti-social behavior in the city.

His comments come after Cumbria Police attended an incident on Monday night in Scotch Street following yet more reports of anti-social behavior and criminal damage.

Police were also seen patrolling The Lanes and Globe Street following anti-social behavior in the area.

Carlisle Mayor Pam Birks believes a ‘zero tolerance’ approach must now be taken to tackle the behavior within the city.

She said: ‘There seems to be an increase in anti-social behavior at the moment and it’s almost as if the police can’t be there all the time.

“In the city center we feel like there are gangs of young people who think they can do whatever they want, so maybe we should have zero tolerance and instead of giving just warnings.

“Maybe we should go further and say enough is enough.

“We’ve been handing out these dispersal orders and all these remedial actions have happened, but maybe with these young people parents should know where they are at night and if they’re not, and that’s going to affect parents pocket so maybe it will make parents more aware of where their kids are or maybe they will have those conversations with their teenager saying ‘look it’s not on “.

“The police are doing their best, but if things don’t work out, maybe we need to be less lenient.

“I would absolutely hate to think there’s going to be a generation of young people with criminal convictions, but maybe that’s where we’ve come to.”

The mayor said she believed many of the problems could be the result of the Covid pandemic, with children not attending school to participate in essential program activities that aim to end anti-social behavior in cities around the world. country.

She said: “I wonder if it’s because the young people who come here have had to deal with Covid and they haven’t been to school to take the citizenship classes on understanding respect and the consequences of their actions.

READ MORE: Police work to tackle anti-social behavior in Carlisle town center

READ MORE: Carlisle Police continue to crack down on anti-social behavior

READ MORE: Carlisle has anti-social behavior problem as youngsters throw bricks at buses

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The city hit by a wave of chaos… where something is seriously wrong https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-city-hit-by-a-wave-of-chaos-where-something-is-seriously-wrong/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 21:21:10 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/the-city-hit-by-a-wave-of-chaos-where-something-is-seriously-wrong/ Alan Sutcliffe was returning from the pub when he saw flames in the nearby park. Police were on the scene, but Alan says another group was already heading towards the park as he drove away. A wave of anti-social behavior has hit the town of Denton in Tameside in recent months. READ MORE:A police investigation […]]]>

Alan Sutcliffe was returning from the pub when he saw flames in the nearby park.

Police were on the scene, but Alan says another group was already heading towards the park as he drove away.

A wave of anti-social behavior has hit the town of Denton in Tameside in recent months.

READ MORE:A police investigation is underway after a ‘seriously injured’ man was found lying in the middle of a road

At its peak, groups of “30 or 40 young people or so” regularly descended on Crownpoint Shopping Park, particularly outside McDonald’s.

Authorities timed and work intensified in the area. Unruly gatherings have diminished.

But that left a smaller number of people, determined to cause unrest in the community, to disperse to other parts of the city.

Victoria Park – tucked away behind Denton Town Hall and Civic Square near Stockport Road – saw two fires in two days on a busy weekend for police and firefighters.

Trash cans were dragged over the park’s Grade II listed bandstand, which is over 100 years old, and set on fire on January 29 and 30.

Alan saw what happened the second of those days.



The fire of January 30, with the police on the scene

He told the Manchester Evening News “I was coming back from the pub when I saw the fire.

“I went to the second gate, I could see the police were already there and I could hear the fire department coming, they got here pretty quickly.

“As I was coming back there was another group of guys on bikes, going back to the park. Around the area there are a lot of guys on scooters and bikes going around.

“They are lucky. The bandstand is old and the roof is wooden, the heat could have done something if it had been left to burn.



Firefighters and police descended on Victoria Park after a fire at the Bandstand
Firefighters and police descended on Victoria Park after a fire at the Bandstand

“There are a few shops where there is always trash outside – are they going to set them on fire too?”

Alan says the park is a hive of activity in the community – with a nearby center where older residents can meet and enjoy tea and toast.

A number of community groups spend their time volunteering to make the area stand out, such as the Trash Pickers and Friends of Victoria Park, while the Denton Park Social Bowling Club plays on the park’s bocce court.

The Yobs targeted the club last summer – rushing onto the green, doing wheelies on bicycles to trash the lush lawn and hurling abuse at its members.

Other members of the Denton community – including Tameside Youth Services, PCSOs and local politicians – rallied in support of the club following the event.

It’s the same community spirit that has driven Neighborhood Police, Council, voluntary groups and businesses to come together to tackle anti-social behavior in Denton.



‘We expect anti-social behavior from the kids and they get out there and move on – but that seems to be something seriously wrong’ (stock image)

So when club secretary Tony Moran heard about the January 30 arson, he “felt physically ill”.

He said: “We thought the tide had turned, we got a lot of support from the community, but to be honest it set our volunteers back a bit. You think, going back hell.

“Everyone is contributing – but it’s still arson.

“We expect anti-social behavior from the kids and they get over it and move on – but that seems like something really wrong.”

Tony says the park has been a “lifeline” for many in the community during the pandemic, but issues of antisocial behavior have shaken the confidence of some.



It's not the first time the bandstand has been targeted
It’s not the first time the bandstand has been targeted

Both Tony and Alan noted that the gates to the park were open on the evening of the fire, although they had been closed on the evening of last year following a previous wave of anti-social behavior.

Arsonists targeted the Denton Park Social clubhouse in 2018.

Two years ago the park experienced three similar bandstand fires in the space of a month, leading Tony to label Victoria Park a ‘no go zone’ at the time.

As more recently, work was put in place to stem the issue in the community in January 2020.

But turbulent scenes at Crownpoint have since been followed by flashes of anti-social behavior across the city, including “young people throwing bottles” in Civic Square, Tony says.

“I think downtown is getting a reputation as a bed,” he added.

“We have people not walking in the park because of this incident with the youngsters, and it’s sad.

“We want to restore the confidence of some of our elderly residents who want to use the park.

“For our part, we will crack to do what we do.”

The problem of anti-social behavior in Denton is well known to MP Andrew Gwynne.



gwynne
Labor MP Andrew Gwynne

He says there has been a ‘massive crackdown’ on the issue at Crownpoint, particularly at McDonald’s, but it has ‘moved’ it to other parts of the city such as Victoria Park.

The Labor MP for Denton said the recent incidents highlight the need to invest in both neighborhood policing and youth services – giving young people something positive to do, while allowing officers to to attack those who intend to wreak havoc.

Andrew said: “The city center is safe overall, but the perception is often very different – when you see kids hanging around and people are worried something is going to happen.

“I get it. That’s why I want the police and youth services to work together, let’s tackle the problem head on, but also advocate for more resources so that the neighborhood police nip this in the bud rather than that. not become a problem.

“It also shows the value of youth work. It’s something that over the last decade has become a Cinderella service.

“It was easy to cut it because it’s not a statutory service, but if you cut work and youth supply at the same time as neighborhood policing you get the perfect storm.”

Andrew notes that the most deprived areas have seen the heaviest cuts to youth services in what has become a “vicious circle”, and believes that investing in young people should be a key part of the ” upgrade” of the government.



The city center is safe overall, but the perception is often very different” (stock image)

“There is no magic money hidden at the town hall,” he added.

Tameside’s new Chief Superintendent Rob Cousen is intent on upending the reputation of Greater Manchester Police among community members, admitting confidence in the force has diminished of late.

He points to the force record in the borough since he took office four months ago – with more than 1,100 arrests and Tameside has seen reductions in a number of different crimes, including anti-social behavior – both as a measure of success and a statement of intent. .

But Chf Supt Cousen admits anti-social behavior at Denton is a key issue.



Chief Superintendent of Tameside, Rob Cousen
Chief Superintendent of Tameside, Rob Cousen

Officers targeted the area outside McDonald’s at Crownpoint, cutting wi-fi and using CCTV to ensure the area no longer attracted loiterers.

The hotspot had attracted groups “of about 30 to 40 people”, says Chf Supt Cousen, but now incidents elsewhere in the city are being carried out by much smaller groups.

The “senseless damage” seen at Victoria Park – with incidents on January 29 and 30 said to be linked – was an issue that had been anticipated by officers following the work at Crownpoint, it adds.

“There’s certainly not a feeling that it’s lawless in Denton,” Superintendent Cousen said.

“The PCSOs and community officers have done an absolutely wonderful job, there is also a lot of work going on with the schools around education.”



Crownpoint Shopping Center (file image)

Chf Supt Cousen says Denton has a great community spirit and a drive to tackle the problem – working with volunteers and businesses.

Events that had dwindled during the pandemic to build trust in the community, like surgeries and neighborhood watch groups, are making a comeback.

Yet while GMP “tries to get people in the right places at the right time”, the force says it depends on community intelligence to get the problem under control.

“We have a small group of young people who intend to provoke anti-social behavior,” added Chf Supt Cousen.

“We will be relentless in prosecuting and deterring them – and if necessary, bringing them to justice.

“We prefer to educate them. We don’t want to criminalize young people but when they trash things that people have put in place, we can’t allow them to do that, we have to do something.”

Get more news from where you live straight to your inbox by subscribing to the free MyTameside newsletter here.

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Jacksonville Humane Society gets $10,000 to continue helping diversify veterinary medicine https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/jacksonville-humane-society-gets-10000-to-continue-helping-diversify-veterinary-medicine/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 02:21:23 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/jacksonville-humane-society-gets-10000-to-continue-helping-diversify-veterinary-medicine/ JACKSONVILLE, Florida. – Students from the Frank H. Peterson Academies of Technology will continue to intern at the Jacksonville Humane Society in hopes of one day becoming veterinarians. For the second year in a row, the Jacksonville Humane Society received a check for $10,000 to pay for a program aimed at bringing more diversity to […]]]>

JACKSONVILLE, Florida. – Students from the Frank H. Peterson Academies of Technology will continue to intern at the Jacksonville Humane Society in hopes of one day becoming veterinarians.

For the second year in a row, the Jacksonville Humane Society received a check for $10,000 to pay for a program aimed at bringing more diversity to the world of veterinary medicine.

Veterinary medicine continues to be one of the least diverse professions in the United States. Dr. Lisa Greenhill, MPA, Ed.D., senior director of institutional research and diversity at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges, revealed that minorities make up just 8% of veterinary staff.

Amya Guest, Savannah Davis and Diamond Canada are all Frank H. Peterson Academies of Technology students who have completed an internship at the Humane Society since last year.

A d

In the year since our last conversation with Davis and Canada, a lot has happened.

“My confidence skyrocketed with animal care and handling,” Canada said.

“Being part of this program has been the best experience I’ve had,” Davis told us.

Guest says she has gained a lot of veterinary knowledge and experience since joining the program.

“I learned way more than I thought when I arrived,” Guest said. “I learned all the surgeries. I learned to handle the animals after the operations.

On Thursday afternoon, the Humane Society received a check for $10,000 from Corporate Traffic Logistics to provide stipends for students participating in the program. Corporate Traffic Logistics’ marketing director says the company is a long-time partner of the Humane Society and believes in providing opportunities for young people.

“The Jacksonville Humane Society has first-class facilities here, and the opportunities are incredible for people to learn a career in animal care,” said Keith Lechwar, marketing director for Corporate Traffic Logistics.

A d

The young women completing the 250 hour internship at the Humane Society are there to master several veterinary skills before entering university and one day becoming veterinarians. And they are fully aware that they are venturing into an area of ​​medicine where the workforce is not as diverse as it could be.

Copyright 2022 by WJXT News4Jax – All Rights Reserved.

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Shop owner assaulted as youth offending rises in Palmerston North https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/shop-owner-assaulted-as-youth-offending-rises-in-palmerston-north/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/shop-owner-assaulted-as-youth-offending-rises-in-palmerston-north/ DAVID UNWIN/Stuff Happy Variety manager Terry Zhang says he was assaulted by the youths who also damaged store property. Retailers in Palmerston North are becoming targets of violent youth crime, and shop owners say they feel unprotected. Terry Zhang, director of Happy Variety on Main Street, appealed for help on the store’s Facebook page after […]]]>
Happy Variety manager Terry Zhang says he was assaulted by the youths who also damaged store property.

DAVID UNWIN/Stuff

Happy Variety manager Terry Zhang says he was assaulted by the youths who also damaged store property.

Retailers in Palmerston North are becoming targets of violent youth crime, and shop owners say they feel unprotected.

Terry Zhang, director of Happy Variety on Main Street, appealed for help on the store’s Facebook page after he was assaulted by three youths on Sunday morning.

The children, who had received multiple trespassing orders, entered the store and used scooters to destroy property, before turning on Zhang.

“They destroyed the store using their scooters and used the scooters to attack me. I had several scratches on my body.

READ MORE:
* Teenagers escape from a juvenile justice center, steal a car and are bitten by the police
* More than 110 teenagers kept in cells for 24 hours or more
* Perform household chores and attend remote conferences being considered for young offenders

Terry Zhang no longer wants to suffer from abuse.

DAVID UNWIN/Stuff

Terry Zhang no longer wants to suffer from abuse.

Zhang wanted stricter laws to be considered when it comes to young people in the justice system.

“We call the police and they issue a trespass order, but the kids are coming back here. The excuse is that the kids are too young to do anything about it, but that’s crazy to me.”

Zhang, who was born in China, said New Zealand laws do not allow retailers to protect themselves.

“Where I come from, people have the right to defend themselves when they are in danger.

“In New Zealand we’re not allowed to, it’s so weird that we’re put in danger and we’re not allowed to do anything, we just have to suffer.”

He wanted the law to be changed to ensure that harsher sentences were imposed on young offenders.

“I think the law is absolutely wrong.

Terry Zhang's store is one of many businesses targeted by young people.

DAVID UNWIN/Stuff

Terry Zhang’s store is one of many businesses targeted by young people.

“We need to do something urgently. This is anti-social behavior and the government and police need to do more. ”

A Broadway Avenue store owner, who did not want to be named, said the same group of young people entered his store before Christmas.

She said they intended to cause trouble, blow vape smoke in her face and verbally abuse her when she asked them to leave.

“This young boy kept repeating to my face: ‘what are you going to do?’ I was alone and I thought ‘what am I going to do?’

“So, I just called the police.”

She said the youngest offender appeared to be only eight or nine years old.

Oranga Tamariki’s director of youth justice, Phil Dinham, said the organization was aware of an increase in youth crime in Palmerston North and was working closely with police to address it.

“Generally when someone is categorized as a young offender, 10 to 14 years old, it’s seen as a care and protection issue and that’s where we come in.

“We work with the police to identify a family issue and meet with the family to discuss parental guidance and any boundaries they should provide.”

Dinham said that once the child reached 14, it became more important for him to take responsibility for his actions.

“It is no longer up to the parent alone to take responsibility for what the child has done.

“The police will visit the family, and we will work with them on how the child will right the wrong and where they go from here.”

Dinham said Oranga Tamariki encouraged victims to participate through family conferencing and talking with the offender and his whānau about how the behavior affected them.

He said when there was a spike in disruptive behavior in an area, Oranga Tamariki mapped it out and started prevention work.

“We are trying to get ahead. In these cases there is usually a core group of problem children, we try to separate them from that group and then work with them individually.

A police media spokeswoman confirmed that police responded to the incident in Happy Valley at 11.30am on Sunday.

The three young people had been referred to youth aid, she said.

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Therapy, society and youth – The Courier https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/therapy-society-and-youth-the-courier/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 18:40:42 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/therapy-society-and-youth-the-courier/ The ancient Greeks believed that without a healthy mind you cannot have a healthy body. Living in the modern world where people have many responsibilities and tasks to perform in their daily lives has an impact on mental health. Healing people’s mental health issues and having a healthier life is what therapy and counseling sessions […]]]>

The ancient Greeks believed that without a healthy mind you cannot have a healthy body. Living in the modern world where people have many responsibilities and tasks to perform in their daily lives has an impact on mental health. Healing people’s mental health issues and having a healthier life is what therapy and counseling sessions are all about.

If we could go back in time, especially a few decades ago, we would see that society did not believe in mental health issues and did not treat them in the same way as they do today. In the early 2000s, people tended to believe that if a person sought a therapist, they were either crazy or had serious problems. Another feature of the past was that society did not accept therapy as an important aspect of people’s lives. People who needed treatment would not see a therapist or, if they did, they would not share it with their society.

According to “statista.com”, therapy looks different in modern society than in previous years. The number of adults who received mental health treatment or counseling from 2002 to 2020 has increased. In 2002, nearly 27.2 million American adults received mental health treatment compared to 2020, where 41.4 million of these people were treated with therapy or counseling.

According to COD Mental Health Advisor Dr. Dennis Emano, to understand the importance of therapy, we must first know what therapy is. A singular definition of therapy would be that therapy treats mental health issues and disorders without medication.

“There are many types of therapy. Each therapy covers the needs of each individual in different aspects. From an early age, people need to know and learn the concept of therapy and mental health. By meeting with a counselor or therapist, individuals can get on the right path to the type of therapy they might need,” Emano said.

Also, according to Dr. Emano, one characteristic that therapy and counseling have in common, perhaps the most important aspect, is that they both try to solve problems.

For example, counseling tends to focus on a specific issue for a specific time frame. However, therapy can be longer term and focus on the individual rather than the problem itself.

When it comes to youth, the future of this world, young adults need to be aware of therapy and its benefits. Young people need therapy or counseling more than ever; coping with stressors like homework and work. But how can young people know when to consult a therapist?

Social media and the stress it causes on the younger generation can be harmful not only for young people, but also for adults. Everyone, regardless of age, should simply ask themselves, “Am I happy? If the answer is “no” or if there is no answer at all, the person should not be afraid to ask for help. Even if the answer is ‘yes’, talking about experiences and why they feel happy can help individuals feel even better,” Emano said.

There is no doubt that mental health is as important as physical health. What society needs to understand is that it’s okay to feel different. It’s okay to ask for help, and it’s okay and normal to attend therapy or counseling sessions.

“The therapy isn’t just for people who have mental issues,” Emano said. “If you are human, you need therapy. Therapy not only helps people to solve their problems, but also helps them to understand themselves deeply and in a more thoughtful way.

Emano said accepting each other helps us accept each other. Therapy and counseling can only work if we as individuals allow therapy and counseling sessions into our lives.

Source: https://www.statista.com/statistics/794027/mental-health-treatment-counseling-past-year-us-adults/

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Student loan debt is hurting the mental health of most borrowers https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/student-loan-debt-is-hurting-the-mental-health-of-most-borrowers/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 13:00:01 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/student-loan-debt-is-hurting-the-mental-health-of-most-borrowers/ Kate Quick, 43, said her student loan debt was causing stress and anxiety for her and her family. Courtesy of Kate Quick When Kate Quick, 43, completed her MFA at the University of Alaska Fairbanks 22 years ago, she had taken out around $30,000 in loans. Now she owes nearly $48,000, even after years of […]]]>

Kate Quick, 43, said her student loan debt was causing stress and anxiety for her and her family.

Courtesy of Kate Quick

When Kate Quick, 43, completed her MFA at the University of Alaska Fairbanks 22 years ago, she had taken out around $30,000 in loans.

Now she owes nearly $48,000, even after years of payments.

“I just can’t think straight every time I have to deal with student loans,” said Quick, who now works for the University of Alaska faculty union.

She also barely missed an opportunity for relief. Quick previously worked as a university professor, so she investigated Public Service Loan Forgiveness, or PSLF, a program that would forgive her debt for working in education.

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The program requires 120 qualifying payments, which takes about 10 years. However, the rules governing the types of eligible payments are strict. Although Quick worked as an assistant and then as a tenure-track professor for 17 years, only the payments she made while employed full-time count toward the program.

She is missing the 120 payments she needs to qualify and she is no longer working for an eligible employer. Now she’s in a different career and sees few opportunities to return to teaching — she doesn’t want to go back to college, and she’s not certified to teach elementary, middle, or high school.

Additionally, Quick had to change its federal home education loans to direct loans when determining PSLF eligibility. This added $17,000 to his principal.

His monthly payments will also increase from $88 to $568 per month. If she follows the current payment plan set out by her service agent, she will end up paying around $170,000 to eliminate her debt. Her husband, a jewelry artist who went back to school to become a computer scientist, also has student loans and has a payment of over $500 a month.

“It freaks me out,” she said, adding that due to student loans, the family had put off buying a home and saving for college for their three teenage boys.

“It has created marital issues over the years because money is something people fight for in relationships,” she said. “And, especially when you don’t have many, that was us.”

A common problem

Quick is not alone. Over 60% of Borrowers Say Student Loan Debt Has Negatively Impacted Their Mental Health, CNBC + Acorns Invest In You Student Loan Survey Finds led by Momentive. The online survey was conducted Jan. 10-13 with a national sample of 5,162 adults.

“When people aren’t able to pay their bills or student loans as quickly as they should, there’s a level of shame and sometimes guilt,” said Aja Evans, a licensed mental health counselor who works with Laurel Road, a digital bank. Platform. “It can quickly turn into feeling bad about yourself and not feeling like you can present who you really are to others because you’re worried about the financial constraints in your life.”

The survey also found that the less a person earns, the more their mental health suffers when it comes to student debt. Less than half of those earning more than $100,000 a year said student debt had a negative impact on their mental health, compared to 59% of those earning between $50,000 and $99,000 and 70% of those earning less than $50,000 a year.

Women and young adults are more likely to report the negative mental health effects of student loan debt, the survey found. Still, more than half of baby boomers said their student debt had a negative impact on their mental state.

“People think student debt is a young people’s problem,” said Betsy Mayotte, president of The Institute of Student Loan Counselors, a non-profit organization that helps student borrowers with free counseling and dispute resolution. But that’s not true, she said, pointing to the millions of older borrowers who are struggling to pay down debt and save for retirement or who are retired and still repaying their loans. .

Why Student Loan Debt Harms Mental Health

There are many reasons why having student loan debt hurts the mental health of borrowers. Many Americans in debt end up postponing other financial milestones, such as having a baby, buying a house, getting married, saving for retirement, or even taking a vacation.

The system is also often difficult to navigate, and in addition to not understanding how their loans work, many borrowers struggle to understand their repayment and relief options.

This confusion can lead to higher balances or other costly errors.

“A lot of people follow income-based repayment plans that reduce what they have to pay each month,” said Bridget Haile, operations manager at Summer, which helps borrowers manage repayment. “The problem is that for many people, even if you make full payments on time every month for years, you’ll often see your loan balance go up rather than down.”

A growing balance, even when you’re making payments, is psychologically difficult to cope with, she said. Also, if someone has defaulted or been unable to make regular payments, it can hurt their credit rating.

And after

The moratorium on federal student loan interest and payments has helped millions of borrowers.

The Biden administration also relaxed PSLF rules, making it easier for some borrowers to obtain forgiveness, and wrote off all debt for some borrowers, such as those enjoyed by for-profit institutions.

Yet many borrowers don’t know how they will resume payments and find it difficult to navigate the systems that could bring them relief. Currently, payments and accrued interest are expected to start again in May.

Quick and her husband don’t know how they will make their monthly payments when they restart.

“We’re both tearing our hair out and wondering what to do because we can’t pay a student loan of $1,100 a month,” she said. “It just makes our heads spin.”

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Glasgow Police say Shettleston gang problem needs officers on the ground https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/glasgow-police-say-shettleston-gang-problem-needs-officers-on-the-ground/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 16:34:21 +0000 https://www.sociologyesoscience.com/glasgow-police-say-shettleston-gang-problem-needs-officers-on-the-ground/ Police must reintegrate into the local community in a bid to prevent growing gang problems among young people in Shettleston, they said. Concerns had previously been raised with Councilor Thomas Kerr that there had been an increase in anti-social behavior in recent months, with reports of young people ‘hanging out in the streets drinking’ because […]]]>

Police must reintegrate into the local community in a bid to prevent growing gang problems among young people in Shettleston, they said.

Concerns had previously been raised with Councilor Thomas Kerr that there had been an increase in anti-social behavior in recent months, with reports of young people ‘hanging out in the streets drinking’ because the community centers they frequented remained closed. Covid-19 result.

READ MORE: Glasgow private driver fined for driving 40mph on the M8 motorway

And now that the pandemic appears to be easing, officers said they want to resume effective community work to try to reverse a rise in crimes such as burglaries and car thefts.

At the Shettleston area partnership meeting on Thursday, members were told by Police Scotland that they would be engaging further with the community.

Officers hope to reduce the number of break-ins and thefts while working with young people in Shettleston and Baillieston to educate them about crime.

A police spokesperson said: ‘We will be engaging with young people as there have been community tensions between gangs in the Parkhead and Shettleston area and the Baillieston and Coatbridge area.

“We are working with our campus officers at East Bank and Bannerman to try to bring these young people together to prevent them from engaging in gang-related activity.

“It will bring officers on the ground to patrol the areas where they hang out and educate them, which is ongoing.”

New staff members will also be encouraged to go out and talk to people, learn about their fears and needs within the community.

They will take steps to reduce dishonesty crimes by putting more vehicles on patrol.

The spokesperson added: “I hope we can get back to more proactive work and restore the community partnerships we were doing before the pandemic.

“I think we need to get back into the community, visit these vulnerable people and engage with them a lot more.

“There appears to have been a slight increase in motor vehicles, burglaries and attempted burglaries.

“We will be implementing more patrols in unmarked vehicles to try and disrupt this behavior and target the individuals involved in it.”



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Following the meeting, Shettleston Councilor Thomas Kerr said he was encouraged to hear that the police would try to address the issue of anti-social behavior in the area.

He said: “We also have to try to do something to help the young people because the problem is that there isn’t really much for the young people to do, so they hang around the streets drinking.

“There is more anti-social behavior because community centers are closed, which is something we really need to look at.

“That’s why it’s reassuring to hear that the police will try to help them.”

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